Linked Questions

7
votes
2answers
88k views

'decide not to' or 'decide to not' ? [duplicate]

I came up with this question when I received an email from a committee with a sentence 'We have decided not to publish it', which seems really strange to me because the grammar I learned in English ...
4
votes
3answers
812 views

'To swiftly go' or 'to go swiftly'? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are split infinitives grammatically incorrect, or are they valid constructs? One of my friends once told me 'to go' is considered a whole word and no word should be put in ...
1
vote
1answer
4k views

“Enables you to quickly and easily identify” vs. “enables you to identify quickly and easily” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are split infinitives grammatically incorrect, or are they valid constructs? I'm currently having a bit of a dispute and would appreciate your help please. Which one is more ...
-1
votes
1answer
8k views

“how to not give up” or “how not to give up” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are split infinitives grammatically incorrect, or are they valid constructs? Order of “not” with infinitive Suppose I want to tell someone that I want to learn ...
1
vote
3answers
7k views

Not to want or to not want? [duplicate]

In English, is saying "It is normal for me to not want 'blank'" correct, or would it be "It is normal for me not to want 'blank'"?
7
votes
1answer
1k views

Is using split infinitive allowed in formal English? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are split infinitives grammatically incorrect, or are they valid constructs? Is it allowed to use split infinitives in formal English? I look into Wikipedia but it is too ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

What comes first—verb or adverb? [duplicate]

Do you say, to effectively communicate or would you say to communicate effectively. As ENL learner I get this confused quite often. Thanks.
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Grammaticality of Star Trek's slogan [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are split infinitives grammatically incorrect, or are they valid constructs? Star Trek's slogan: To boldly go where no man has gone before. "To boldy go" sounds right, but ...
0
votes
1answer
404 views

To better share or to share better [duplicate]

Which of these two phrases would be correct in a sentence:- 'To better share' or 'to share better'?
0
votes
1answer
267 views

Is “To [Adverb] [Infinitive]” Still a Valid Infinitive form? [duplicate]

This question is specifically for I work to nearly get success, but the question is also asking in general. I shouldn't use nearly to get because that would detract from from my purpose of working.
-1
votes
2answers
216 views

Split infinitives [duplicate]

Was taught in grammar school that this was taboo (1950's, South Africa). Today the split infinitive seems to be the standard in the USA. Changing standard? It's always even that way in the US? What ...
1
vote
0answers
59 views

Choosing the correct sentence [duplicate]

Which one of these sounds correct (American English)? Is there a better way of saying this? I was not sober enough for you not to notice I'd been drinking. I was not sober enough for you to not ...
0
votes
0answers
52 views

“to successfully complete” or “to complete successfully”? [duplicate]

A Google search yields 41,200,000 results for the former but only 3,150,000 for the latter. Are split infinitives really to boldly be avoided in English grammar, or are millions of people just ...
0
votes
0answers
47 views

Revising Split Infinitives [duplicate]

One of my students refuses to split infinitives. His solution is to put the adverb directly before the infinitive, without fail, five times in two pages of writing. Telling him to split the infinitive ...
1
vote
0answers
29 views

Adverb and verb position [duplicate]

I want you to clearly understand that excuses will not do. I want you to understand clearly that excuses will not do. My book says that second sentence is correct. What is the logic behind it?

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