Linked Questions

5
votes
3answers
13k views

What's the subject of “There is my biscuit!” ? And how about “There is one biscuit left”?

What's the subject, grammatically speaking, of these sentences? There is my biscuit! My biscuit is there! There is one biscuit left. I don't really know how to analyze these. The following ...
10
votes
3answers
26k views

Can “it” be used with plural subject?

Several years ago I heard of something called dummy subjects in high school. It was then stated that, for example, it is a dummy subject when it starts many instances of sentences, e.g. It is ...
4
votes
3answers
15k views

“There is the man.” Is *there* an adverb or pronoun?

According to Dictionary.com there adverb in or at that place (opposed to here ): She is there now. pronoun (used to introduce a sentence or clause in which ...
1
vote
3answers
848 views

“There exists” vs “There is determined”

Mathematical writing tend to be very repetitive. To be clear, I do not consider this as something necessarily evil: Mathematics is a language in its own right, and a very technical one, where most of ...
3
votes
5answers
559 views

“There was a man known as the 'Toe Suck Fairy'” — is “there” a complement?

To me, man is the subject and it has two verbs — was and known —, making there a complement. My teacher argued that the verb is "was known".
3
votes
3answers
1k views

What grammar is used in “are there” for not a question & “is a compromise view” without a subject?

I have found 2 sentences in a law book, but I cannot figure out what grammar rules are used in them. Please advise. 1.) In no state, however, are there [what rule, why such order of the words?] ...
2
votes
2answers
212 views

defining the subject

It is commonly asserted that the subject of a sentence is the noun or pronoun that does something or exists in a particular state of being. Therefore, in the sentence "All but Jones are here" the ...
3
votes
1answer
491 views

“Police say there appear to be signs of a break-in.” Why “appear” instead of “appears”?

Here is an example: Police say there appear to be signs of a break-in. I wonder why appears was not used instead of appear in the preceding sentence. Can linking verbs function as modal verbs?
0
votes
2answers
263 views

There is expected to be [closed]

I came across a sentence: There is expected to be an improvement in the transportation system in that town. The term: there is expected to be sounded strange to me. Is it grammatically correct? ...
3
votes
3answers
249 views

“there was” versus “was”

In a Lynda.com tutorial I came across such a sentence: "In camera uploads (folder) are all the photos that I had in my iPad". Instead, I would have probably said: "In camera uploads there are ...." Is ...
1
vote
1answer
95 views

“There was some [fine skiing there / shooting in the streets]”

I would like to ask if the following sentences are grammatically correct and whether the constructions are similar: There was some fine skiing there. There was some shooting in the streets.
1
vote
1answer
45 views

There was vs. was

Recently, a native English speaker (I'm not) suggested I'd improve a sentence of mine by removing a superfluous there: Against the wall there was a yellow bicycle. This made me think: is there any ...
0
votes
0answers
46 views

What part of speech is “there”, as in “…there could be” [duplicate]

Consider this sentence: There could be a chance. What part of speech is the word there in this sentence?