Linked Questions

4
votes
2answers
161k views

Which is correct - “most quiet” or “quietest”? [duplicate]

A friend of mine saw a gun at the store that was labeled as the "most quiet gun". Is this correct English or is it more correct to say, the "quietest gun"?
2
votes
1answer
33k views

Kinder vs More Kind [duplicate]

Do we say "kinder" or "more kind"? I found people saying both things over the internet and got confused. Which is the correct one?
1
vote
2answers
410 views

“More acrid than” but “stupider than” Why is that? [duplicate]

I've just read this quotation here at StackExchange: "Think of how stupid the average person is, and realize half of them are stupider than that." I've checked a few online dictionaries and there ...
0
votes
2answers
577 views

Degrees of comparison [duplicate]

I believe, both variants are possible: friendlier / more friendly; and the friendliest / the most friendly. I'd like to know what is used in every day speech more often and which is more formal.
0
votes
0answers
480 views

Why is it sometimes 'most' and sometimes '-est'? [duplicate]

There are various rules about whether an adjective takes '-er/-est' or 'more/most', but they're based on syllable count and don't give an etymological rationale. Does anyone know? Is it based on ...
0
votes
0answers
479 views

comparatives - “easier” or “more easy”, “friendlier” or “more friendly” [duplicate]

Yes, this is a question that people keep repeating about comparatives, especially with these adjectives: easy, pretty, friendly, lively. I know the rule about two-syllable adjectives ending in /i/ ...
0
votes
0answers
477 views

Is 'most ugly' a correct term? [duplicate]

My friend recently said "My parents got me the most ugly Sherry glasses I've ever seen". He is a native English speaker and said that 'most ugly' in this context is correct even though I've always ...
141
votes
4answers
761k views

“More clear” vs “Clearer”: when to use “more” instead of “-er”?

Which one of these adjectives is correct? I can see that both of them are being used, I'm just not sure which one is grammatically correct. Are there any general rules to follow as to the use of one ...
12
votes
5answers
80k views

What's wrong with “stupider”?

On online boards I've seen some people claim that "stupider" is ungrammatical. I can't see any reason why it would be, and it seems like it's commonly used. Google Ngram Viewer And it's also in ...
14
votes
4answers
120k views

“Much more easy” versus “much easier”

My mom and I are having a dispute on much more easy versus much easier. For example, consider the sentence: It's [much more easy]/[much easier] to do action X than action Y. I say that much easier ...
2
votes
3answers
79k views

“Poorer” vs. “more poor”

As a non-native speaker I am curious about the everyday usage of more poor in contrast to poorer. The dictionary dictates poorer as the correct form, with some allowing both forms. According to ...
1
vote
2answers
13k views

Is “preciser” a valid comparative of “precise”?

I encountered preciser as a comparative of precise and thought it was incorrect. However, some reputable online dictionaries (1, 2) return hits for "preciser". But they do not explicitly list the ...
2
votes
4answers
7k views

more unhealthy vs. unhealthier

First off, I'm not a native speaker but this question isn't about the rules themselves but rather usage in the USA. I learnt that you should say 'unhealthier' (and the Oxford + Longman dictionaries I ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

Is it incorrect to use “more gentle”?

Most dictionaries list "gentler" as the comparative form of "gentle", but "more gentle" also sounds correct. According to this forum post, it is.
3
votes
2answers
886 views

“More thicker hair”? Is it correct to use 'more' with comparative adjectives?

I was watching a YouTube video the other day and I found a sentence that intrigued me. The woman, Jessica Vill, was talking about her wig collection and when describing one of the wigs she said ...

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