Linked Questions

2
votes
1answer
248 views

Etymology of progressive forms [duplicate]

In spite of English the German language does not have Present/Past Progressive, although both languages have the same root. When and why did the progressive tenses develop and became part of the ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

What is the origin of the progressive [duplicate]

What is the origin of the progressive form of the english verbs
19
votes
3answers
12k views

Does a gerund always end with “-ing”? If so, why?

After asking what the difference is between a gerund and a participle, I began to wonder if all gerunds end with -ing, since I couldn't think of any that didn't. If they do, why?
10
votes
5answers
2k views

progressive forms: participle or gerund?

Progressive forms of verbs consist of the form to be + participle. At least that is what most English grammars say or they are imprecise and speak of the -ing form. My question is what follows after ...
4
votes
4answers
6k views

What is correct in this case, “probable” or “probably”?

I usually don't have trouble distinguishing when I should use an adjective and when an adverb. But today I wrote a sentence, and wasn't sure — actually, the longer I looked at it, the longer both ...
6
votes
1answer
13k views

Should I modify a gerund using an adjective or an adverb?

I know that a gerund is a noun, so it should be modified by an adjective. However, it is also a verb form. Can I modify it by using an adverb?
1
vote
2answers
2k views

When does a gerund become a verb?

My question is a follow-up to one in which I identified stealing and killing in a particular sentence as gerunds. Bill J commented to the effect that if objects followed these gerunds, the latter ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Why does “-ing” go to “-in” in some dialects?

In some English dialects "-ing" is replaced by "-in" (e.g., "taking" to "talkin'"). "ng" ([ŋ]), the velar nasal consonant, is done at the back of the mouth, but "n" ([n]), the alveolar nasal ...
1
vote
1answer
573 views

It is about Gerunds and present participle [duplicate]

Please clarify if what I have mentioned below is correct. I like painting. - Gerund? I like painting pictures. - Present participle?
2
votes
1answer
136 views

For the linguists among us: I like loud singing vs I like singing loudly

Can you explain why using "loud" as either an adjective or an adverb changes the meaning of the sentence. Is it just an English convention, or is there something deeper going on? I like loud singing =...