Linked Questions

54
votes
12answers
35k views

I can run faster than _____. (1) him (2) he?

Consider the sentence "I can run faster than 15 miles per hour." Its meaning is clear and to my eyes obviously grammatically correct. Now let me present some variations that have given me trouble for ...
10
votes
5answers
29k views

“like I” or “like me”?

In high school we learned to say "than I" and "as I" because you could potentially add an "am" to the end of the sentence. Examples: "She is smarter than I." (Think: "...than I am.") "He is as tall ...
2
votes
2answers
154 views

What is correct: “I don't wake up as soon as him” or “as soon as he”? [duplicate]

I guess "he", because I can say "as soon as he does", but I feel like "him" should be correct as well.
16
votes
1answer
2k views

“not as” versus “less”

English speakers seem to prefer "less powerful" over "not as powerful", and "not as big" over "less big". There's at least a ten-to-one ratio in both cases—See this Google Ngram. There also seems to ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

how to understand “as ~ as ever”

Nosey Flynn was sitting up in his usual corner of Davy Byrne's and, when he heard the story, he stood Farrington a half-one, saying it was as (1) smart a thing as (2) ever (3) he heard. (James ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

When do you leave out the preposition in a relative clause?

A non-fiction titled "Do the Right Thing" published in 1998 has this sentence: (1) Am I treating this stranger with the same consideration that I would a friend? Another book (fiction) titled "...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Difference between “not as…as” and “not …er than”

In what kind of situation can we use "not as...as" not "not ...er than"? This question is not as easy as that one. This question is not easier than that one. This question is more difficult ...
-2
votes
1answer
791 views

As/so sth as: subjective or objective pronoun?

Which of the following is the correct grammar usage? We scored as many runs as they. We scored as many runs as them? Wren and Martin says nothing about this case. Please explain the rule ...
-2
votes
5answers
383 views

“She did X with the same enthusiasm she would have done Y.”

I have this sentence in something I'm writing: She slipped her head into the helmet with the same enthusiasm she would have slipped it into a guillotine. This sounds wrong to me. I feel like it ...
1
vote
3answers
297 views

Making sense out of the big mess construction

Most grammarians are trying to analyze the big mess construction as a noun phrase, but it seems to me that the construction is actually headed by an adjective. Mary was good Here, "good" is a ...