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83 votes
7 answers
681k views

What does the phrase "Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish" mean?

It was Steve Jobs's ending comment in the Stanford Commencement in 2005, and Jobs mentioned: Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish. What does this phrase mean? I understand this may also seem philosophical, ...
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  • 2,843
37 votes
4 answers
1.4m views

Difference between "How are you?" and "How are you doing?"

I've heard a lot of times that there is a major difference between saying: How are you? and How are you doing? Is that true? I've heard one was like an extension of “Hello” and does not mean ...
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  • 505
52 votes
3 answers
1.1m views

When should I use "Would", "Would have", "Will", and "Will have"?

I hope someone, once and for all, can clarify (with examples) the difference in usage of will vs. would vs. would have vs. will have.
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15 votes
6 answers
532k views

A word for feeling simultaneously happy & sad

I'm looking for a word that means feeling both happy and sad at the same time. Here's a sentence I'd like to use it in: "At least we got one vote," she said with a (word I'm looking for) smile.
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  • 151
50 votes
6 answers
1.4m views

In sex talk, how many bases are there and what do they all mean?

I always hear people say "I hit the third base" or "I hit the second base" (sex related). I am not 100% sure what they all mean. Additionally, in one of the House MD episodes, there was a dialogue: ...
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  • 21.5k
34 votes
7 answers
972k views

Why use BCE/CE instead of BC/AD?

When I was a kid, I was always taught to refer to years using BC (Before Christ) and AD (Anno Domini / year of our Lord). However, I somewhat regularly hear people referring to years as in the CE (...
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  • 12.3k
63 votes
4 answers
1.2m views

When is it necessary to use "have had"?

I have come across a few sentences that contain "have had". I would like to know in what kind of situations we should use this combination.
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  • 871
77 votes
7 answers
658k views

Where does the period go when using parentheses?

Where should the period go when using parentheses? For example: In sentence one, I use this example (which has a parenthesis at the end.) Should the period be inside, or outside of the parentheses?...
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107 votes
15 answers
1.1m views

Which is correct, "you and I" or "you and me"?

When the phrase is used as an object, why so many native speakers are saying "you and I" instead of "you and me"? I'm not a native speaker but I thought "you and me" is correct. Not sure if this falls ...
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  • 3,554
44 votes
3 answers
324k views

What's the difference between a gerund and a participle?

What is the difference between a gerund and a participle?
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  • 2,019
40 votes
10 answers
1.1m views

What is an appropriate response to "what's up" greeting?

Sorry if it's a trivial question, but when someone uses what's up as a greeting I have no idea what they want to hear. What are the possible answers and what does this question mean exactly?
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  • 5,003
19 votes
10 answers
842k views

What is the difference between "curd" and "yogurt"?

Most people use the words curd and yogurt interchangeably. Both are made by fermenting milk. Is there a difference between the two, or are they the same?
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  • 317
28 votes
5 answers
713k views

“Thank you very much” vs. “Thank you so much”

Some people used to say: Thank you very much. Where others say: Thank you so much. Could anybody please explain what differences there may be between those, whether of correctness or ...
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  • 281
87 votes
12 answers
1.2m views

How do you greet multiple recipients in an e-mail?

How do you greet multiple recipients in an e-mail? Assuming they're both male, I just use "Sirs", but it seems a bit informal.
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  • 2,294
179 votes
12 answers
1.0m views

When to use "If I was" vs. "If I were"?

If I was... If I were... When is it correct to use "If I was" vs. "If I were" in standard English?
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  • 2,021
21 votes
10 answers
500k views

Any other good way of saying "Happy Birthday"?

Quite a few of my friends are having their birthdays in the coming weeks. I feel a little awkward posting plain words like "Happy Birthday" on their Facebook pages. I've decided I should come up with ...
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  • 9,974
121 votes
24 answers
1.0m views

"Lunch" vs. "dinner" vs. "supper" — times and meanings?

I've seen cases where a noon-time meal is referred to as dinner, and the evening meal is called supper. There's also lunch around noon followed by dinner in the evening. Is there a particular ...
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  • 1,341
32 votes
5 answers
772k views

"At/on (the) weekend(s)"

Which expression is better? Which is right? Why? A. Sorry to disturb you at weekend. B. Sorry to disturb you on weekend. C. Sorry to disturb you at weekends. D. Sorry to ...
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34 votes
6 answers
456k views

Difference between "résumé" and "CV"

What's the difference between résumé and CV? When is résumé used? And when is CV used? Are they equivalent?
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  • 451
135 votes
2 answers
908k views

"Which" vs. "what" — what's the difference and when should you use one or the other?

Most of the time one or the other feels better, but every so often, "which" vs. "what" trips me up. So, what's the exact difference and when should you use one or the other?
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73 votes
2 answers
1.4m views

"Dear Sir or Madam" versus "To whom it may concern"

When is it appropriate to use the terms Dear Sir or Madam and To whom it may concern? The rules I was taught state that Dear Sir or Madam should be used when you're writing a letter to a person about ...
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  • 5,847
2 votes
3 answers
356k views

Is this sentence correct? "I let you know...."

Is it correct to say the following? I let you know that I have sent you a letter. Or is there a better way to say this sentence? For example: I inform you that I have sent you a letter.
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  • 29
18 votes
5 answers
894k views

I would like to kindly ask you could you check......?

I just want to know I would like to kindly ask you could you check......? could be a right structure for asking question? regards
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  • 301
33 votes
7 answers
761k views

Difference between "at" and "in" when specifying location

I am used to saying "I am in India.". But somewhere I saw it said "I am at Puri (Oriisa)". I would like to know the differences between "in" and "at" in the above two sentences.
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98 votes
3 answers
952k views

Should I use a comma before "and" or "or"?

Is using a comma then an "and" or an "or" after it proper punctuation? Example: I fell over, and hurt my knee. Should I go, or not?
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  • 983
60 votes
3 answers
842k views

"Agree on" vs. "agree with" vs. "agree to"

What are the differences between "agree on", "agree with" and "agree to"?
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82 votes
6 answers
1.2m views

Is it "Yours faithfully" or "Yours sincerely"?

When should one sign a letter with "Yours faithfully" or "Yours sincerely"?
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  • 1,963
46 votes
6 answers
964k views

"Paid" vs "payed"

I think I have always used these two words interchangeably without noticing until my professor was saying how some students misspelled the word and he was amazed. Can someone tell me when I should ...
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  • 627
60 votes
9 answers
419k views

Data pronunciation: "dayta" or "dahta"?

I hear "dayta" more often, but what's the correct pronunciation?
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  • 719
35 votes
2 answers
730k views

"Angry with" vs. "angry at" vs. "angry on"

Which is the most appropriate/correct usage? Are you angry on me? Are you angry with me? Are you angry at me?
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  • 453
88 votes
5 answers
722k views

"Consist in" vs. "consist of"

I would like to clarify this once and for all: What is the correct use of "consist in" vs. "consist of"? "Meditation consists in/of attentive watchfulness." "The ...
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  • 1,310
12 votes
5 answers
849k views

Is it correct to say "I kindly request you to..."?

Isn't kindness already implied when you say "I request you to..."? When I say "I humbly request you to...", the word humbly helps me to label the state of my behavior during the request. On the ...
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  • 965
32 votes
4 answers
834k views

"Could you please" vs "Could you kindly"

I am a non-native speaker of English. When communicating with a professor, would it be better to use could you kindly send me the document or could you please send me the document? I know both are ...
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  • 441
18 votes
7 answers
935k views

"Belated happy birthday" or "happy belated birthday"?

What's the correct sentence? Belated happy birthday! Happy belated birthday!
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  • 331
13 votes
4 answers
728k views

"Thank you all" — wrong or right?

On many occasions after we complete a speech, we often consider thanking our audience. In this scenario, I am not sure if "Thank you all" is the right English. Should it be "Thanking you all" instead ...
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  • 239
28 votes
6 answers
604k views

"I use to", or "I used to"

Which is the correct sentence, if there is a correct one? I use to be a hitman. I used to be a hitman. I've read the second sentence recently in a book, but I was sure it should be I use to be ...
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  • 571
31 votes
6 answers
959k views

"All The Best" vs "Best of Luck"

I heard somewhere that if we wish someone younger than us then say "best of luck" and if we wish someone older than us then say "all the best". I don't know how much of this is true. Will you please ...
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  • 1,123
71 votes
5 answers
906k views

Should I put myself last? "me and my friends" vs. "my friends and me" or "my friends and I"

I've always been taught to put myself last when referring to myself in the same sentence as others but the usage of "me and..." seems to be everywhere these days. The misuse of the word "me" instead ...
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  • 1,433
20 votes
4 answers
792k views

Which one is correct, "best wishes to you" or "best wishes for you"?

Which one is correct, "best wishes to you" or "best wishes for you"?
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0 votes
4 answers
272k views

How to say the total amount?

I'm not sure if the saying of the total amount USD 23,428.32 is correct below (esp. the 'cent' part after the dot): Say U.S. dollars twenty-three thousand four hundred and twenty-eight and thirty-...
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  • 89
6 votes
6 answers
242k views

Grammatical Names and Grammatical Functions

What is the grammatical name and grammatical function of the part of the sentence that is in bold? What the teacher taught was not in the students' text. The principal ate what was left in the pot.
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58 votes
10 answers
848k views

Polite alternatives to "as soon as possible"

I’ve found myself writing the phrase “as soon as possible” just too often. Sometimes I wonder if it sounds a little rude. How can I convey the same meaning in a more polite way but without losing ...
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  • 1,505
17 votes
4 answers
556k views

What does "thot" mean and when was it first used?

The word thot is all over Twitter. The @lovihatibot Twitterbot routinely finds it in searches for "I love the word [X]" and "I hate the word [X]", in fact it's the most hated word and third most ...
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  • 65.6k
43 votes
8 answers
898k views

What's the difference between "I look forward to" and "I'm looking forward to"?

I just don't get the reasoning behind which one is correct in which situation. Typically I use the wrong one, or I use them when I'm not supposed to.
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  • 1,853
52 votes
6 answers
707k views

"Call me through/at/on this number"

What is the difference between the following when referring to telephone calls? Please call me on this number. You can reach me on this number. Please call me at this number. You can reach me at ...
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26 votes
5 answers
265k views

What are "coherence" and "cohesion" in text linguistics?

I am still learning English. My English language professor has given me an assignment on coherence and cohesion. But it seems difficult to me. I've consulted my friend and he told me: Cohesion and ...
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  • 473
60 votes
14 answers
855k views

More formal way of saying: "Sorry to bug you again about this, but ..."

I was wondering if there was a more formal and polite way of saying: Sorry to bug you again about this, but we still have not received a response about X .... (if we still have not received any ...
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14 votes
5 answers
517k views

If you are talking "on behalf of" you and someone else, what is the correct usage?

If you are talking on behalf of you and someone else what is the correct usage? On behalf of my wife and me On behalf of my wife and I On behalf of me and my wife On behalf of myself and my wife On ...
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81 votes
2 answers
848k views

"Have a look" vs. "Take a look"

What is the difference between Have a look and Take a look (meaning/connotations)? For example: Have a look at the question. Take a look at the question. For some reason I only found first version, ...
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  • 1,195
20 votes
6 answers
548k views

Formal way to tell someone they accidentally sent you someone else’s email?

I have received an email from someone at work. He’s quite senior and probably would get quite angry to get an “accusing” message like: I wasn’t supposed to get this email. It looks like you sent me ...
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  • 15.3k