8

For example:

Ever wish you could share information broadly

Could it be rewritten to:

Ever wish you could broadly share information

Are there any rules for the position of the adverbs.

8

The positioning of the adverb should be based on the type of impact our sentence/question needs to make.

The first sentence:

Ever wish you could share information broadly?

This would be more effective when used to catch the readers' attention, probably an advertisement/headline where the idea is to make all readers imagine "broadly".

The second one:

Ever wish you could broadly share information?

This probably has more stress on the "information" rather than on "broadly". It would sound more apt in a paragraph, rather than in a headline.

Again, it depends on how the message needs to be sent across. Both options are correct.

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12

When an adverb modifies a verb, you can usually put it either before, between, or after:

Adverb = 'often', verb = 'go'

Before:

Often, I go for long walks.

Between:

I often go for long walks.

End:

I go for long walks often.

These aren't all equally common; you would probably find the between position used the most.

In your example, you are asking a question, so the 'before' position can't really be used.

Broadly, ever wish you could share information?

Just doesn't work.

But the between and end position are equally valid. I would say that, again, the between position sounds best.

Ever wish you could broadly share information?

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  • 1
    If someone said "Broadly, ever wish you could share information?" I would interpret 'broadly' as being applied to my explanation. In other words, they're asking for a broad overview of whether I wish I could share information, not asking about information that is broadly shared. – DCShannon Nov 3 '14 at 18:20
3

I always think the adverb should be placed as closely as possible to the word it modifies. See how I did it in this sentence, with "as closely as possible"?

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