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For example,

the estimated spend for Q3 is a million dollars.

  • 1
    +1 I was thinking about this question just this weekend. Also, the proper term for "nounification" is nominalize. :) – Zairja Aug 21 '12 at 18:24
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    It comes from the verb spend, of course. :) – Robusto Aug 21 '12 at 18:31
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    You may also want to refer to this blog and the OED entry. The word does have a long history (not slang or business jargon), but has become more popular in business circles in recent decades. a1688; J. Bunyan Israel's Hope Encouraged in Wks. (1855) I. 618; "What if I cannot but live upon the spend all my days, yet, if my friend will always supply my need, is it not well for me?" – Zairja Aug 21 '12 at 18:31
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It comes from the verb spend and according to the Oxford English Dictionary, the noun (the action of spending money or the amount spent) has been used since before 1688, in The works of John Bunyan: with an introduction to each treatise, notes, and a sketch of his life, times, and contemporaries:

What if I cannot but live upon the spend all my days, yet, if my friend will always supply my need, is it not well for me?

Or, specifically as the amount spent, the earliest quotation is from 1976, in Computers in Higher Education & Research:

About £21 million should be spent for universities on new machines, buildings and operating costs..with a spend of about £10 million for research councils for similar purposes.

  • Aaargh; it's a British-ism! Does the (unlinkable) OED contain any info about this usage crossing the Atlantic in recent years or decades? – Kenny Evitt Jun 9 '17 at 20:22
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    @KennyEvitt No, but the entry "has not yet been fully updated (first published 1914)" with the most recent quotation from 1983. All the quotations look British. – Hugo Jun 10 '17 at 8:37

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