1

I want to say “my advisor has been very helpful, from helping me decide which classes to take to letting me know/telling me about the resources available to me”.

I think saying “letting me know” or “telling me about” is too clunky.

Are there any other ways of saying this?

4

There are always other ways to say something. Maybe you could say:

My advisor has been helpful, from helping me decide on courses to take to informing me about available resources.

0

Describing perhaps, and its synonyms or maybe listing and its synonyms.

0

1) My advisor has been very helpful, from helping me decide which classes to take to guiding me toward the resources available to me

Merriam-Webster defines the verb guide as

transitive verb 2 a : to direct, supervise, or influence usually to a particular end
e.g. Her example helped to guide me toward a career in medicine.

Usage notes: guide implies intimate knowledge of the way and of all its difficulties and dangers

N.B. You don't normally guide a person about something, in the OP's sentence the following prepositions: to, toward, or through would be more appropriate.

Alternatively, consider the verb counsel which means to give advice, as in:

Careers officers should counsel young people in making their career decisions

2) My advisor has been very helpful, from helping me decide which classes to take to counselling me about the resources available.

-3

Your advisor? Just use advised.

  • 1
    Advised would be a poor choice stylistically in the example sentence (with adviser already mentioned). – Andrew Leach Nov 24 '14 at 23:45
  • @AndrewLeach stylistically poor perhaps, but it fits. And who says advisor cannot be changed to mentor / tutor / counsellor etc. – Mari-Lou A Nov 25 '14 at 8:26

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