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I'm having a disagrement with the correct use of the apostrophe in the following sentence.

It is your responsibility to declare your fuel purchase at the checkout and not the stores.

I think that there should be an apostrophe before the second s in stores. As it is the store's responsiblity. However it is being claimed that the apostrophe is not used if it's afterwards.

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    "...if it's afterwards"? After what? You're right, anyway: it's definitely "store's". – Andrew Leach Jul 15 '12 at 9:46
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Let's untangle this a little bit.

It's your responsibility to close the door not mine.

As you can see I should use the possessive form mine. So the same goes for your example. But I wouldn't use and as it makes the sentence a bit unorthodox.

It is your responsibility to declare your fuel purchase at the checkout, and not the store's.

As @Robusto suggested, it's better to put your and store's closer together.

It is your responsibility, not the store's, to declare your fuel purchase at the checkout.

  • I agree that the and is unusual, but something is definitely needed there to show the meaning is not at the checkout rather than at the stores. A comma would do, but they aren't popular on signs. – TimLymington Jul 15 '12 at 10:36
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    Additionally, it would help to put your and store's closer together: "It is your responsibility, not the store's, to declare your fuel purchase at the checkout." – Robusto Jul 15 '12 at 11:17
  • Please add a comma after checkout for clarity. – Kris Jul 15 '12 at 11:53
  • @Robusto- edited it based on your comments. – Noah Jul 15 '12 at 11:57
  • @Kris- I added one, but I am not sure if that's needed on signs, as Tim suggested. – Noah Jul 15 '12 at 11:58

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