0

I am having a brochure designed and wish to place the words "Many Thanks" on the very back of it after all the policies are listed.

Which is more correct? to capitalise the first letter of the first word only--or the first letter of both words?

4
  • 2
    That, especially on a stand-alone piece, is purely a matter of style.
    – JLG
    Commented Apr 26, 2012 at 11:45
  • Okay. Good to know. I SO appreciate this. Going to the printer....
    – Akilah
    Commented Apr 26, 2012 at 12:00
  • If you had asked for copy editing reasons, your post is likely to be closed. Please avoid. (Maybe you've already left on your errand.)
    – Kris
    Commented Apr 26, 2012 at 12:08
  • I see. I didn't literally run to the printers. Silly figure of speech I guess. I was just excited to have validation for my instinct in this regard. My instinct was to capitalise both. I'm just working with a designer who is helping me with a concept for my small business brochure and price list. I didn't realise there might be a conflict. Duly noted.
    – Akilah
    Commented Apr 26, 2012 at 12:30

2 Answers 2

1

I always write small letter, if there is no reason to write it as a capital. In this case I do not see a reason to write "Thanks", so I would use "Many thanks".

0
1

It's natural and common to capitalize both, in a context such as the one in your example. It is known as 'Title Case'.

This will help you avoid the more important word 'thanks' appearing less prominent than 'many', which is only an intensifier.

3
  • 1
    Title case is for titles. Capitalizing Important words in the Middle of a sentence is simply Not done in English.
    – RegDwigнt
    Commented Apr 26, 2012 at 12:05
  • @Reg Dwight. Pl read the post title and the Q. It's stand-alone and on the back cover, sort of. I can understand your haste.
    – Kris
    Commented Apr 26, 2012 at 12:15
  • Oh!I wondered if there would be a difference between US and UK grammar on this point. Yes, these two words are a stand-alone on the back. After stating the policies I simply wanted to be sure to thank them
    – Akilah
    Commented Apr 26, 2012 at 12:25

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.