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I'm not sure if the saying of the total amount USD 23,428.32 is correct below (esp. the 'cent' part after the dot):

Say U.S. dollars twenty-three thousand four hundred and twenty-eight and thirty-two cents.

And if it is 23,428.00, do I say

Say U.S. dollars twenty-three thousand four hundred and twenty-eight only.

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4 Answers 4

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On a check – which is one of the few places where you see such numbers written out in their long form – you might see any of the following conventions used:

  • Twenty-three thousand four hundred twenty-eight dollars & thirty-two cents
  • Twenty-three thousand four hundred twenty-eight dollars and 32 cents
  • Twenty-three thousand four hundred twenty-eight dollars and 32/100

I don't believe too many people would use the top one, though – not when they were writing out the number in longhand – although you might see the number of cents spelled out on a computer-printed check.

In the case where the dollar amount is even, you might see:

  • Twenty-three thousand four hundred twenty-eight dollars and no cents
  • Twenty-three thousand four hundred twenty-eight dollars and no/100
  • Twenty-three thousand four hundred twenty-eight dollars & 0/100
  • Twenty-three thousand four hundred twenty-eight dollars only

I think the last one is relatively uncommon, although I've personally used it for decades. (I first saw it as a teenager, thought it was a cool, quirky way to write checks in even amounts, and so I adopted the practice.) Sometimes I'll even use the word exactly, when the dollar amount is more even:

  • Twenty-three thousand four hundred dollars exactly

although I don't usually write checks in that large an amount.

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    I also often use xx/100 for zero cents. Commented Aug 18, 2014 at 0:51
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    When speaking, I use even, like "that'll be 43 dollars even".
    – BradC
    Commented Mar 8, 2017 at 15:12
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If I was saying them, bearing in mind I am a native Brit:

Twenty-three thousand, four hundred and twenty-eight dollars, and thirty-two cents

(with that first 'and' being used in speech, but not in writing eg on a cheque, although interestingly in the UK you can use that first 'and')

and

Twenty-three thousand, four hundred and twenty-eight dollars

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    Prescriptively (and on bank documents), the first 'and' should not be used; it should only be used as a separator between the dollars and the cents. In speech, it's hard to avoid the first 'and'.
    – Mitch
    Commented Apr 23, 2012 at 15:54
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    Rory Alsop, in the UK, it's not just a case of you can use that first and. It is normal to use it.
    – Tristan r
    Commented Jul 1, 2014 at 13:14
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    Maybe I should strengthen the point, Tristan. I was aiming to point out the difference between the American way and ours.
    – Rory Alsop
    Commented Jul 1, 2014 at 13:17
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    Mitch, it would be enlightening if you would mention where in the world, your comment applies. In England and the rest of the UK, the first and is normal and therefore, should be used.
    – Tristan r
    Commented Jul 1, 2014 at 13:19
  • Rory Alsop, that would be helpful to non-native speakers.
    – Tristan r
    Commented Jul 1, 2014 at 13:19
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In US English and is used only to separate Dollars and cents.

101 is written One hundred one with no and.

US$ 101.50 would be written as US Dollar One hundred One and Fifty cents

Where the amount is a whole number (no cents), it is terminated by the word Only:

Dollars One hundred One only.

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Probably your answer is true. But i can write USD 23,428.32 as " U. S. DOLLARS TWENTY-THREE THOUSAND FOUR HUNDRED TWENTY-EIGHT AND THIRTY-TWO HUNDREDTHS".

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    Nobody in the US uses "hundredths" to describe "cents" normally
    – user10893
    Commented Apr 23, 2012 at 6:56
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    @simchona: except on a check, where most would write 32/100 after the "...Twenty-Eight" (sorry, I couldn't write it in all CAPS, it was getting too loud in here)
    – J.R.
    Commented Apr 23, 2012 at 8:57
  • @J.R. I know that write it in all CAPS, getting too loud in here. I write all in caps because to notify people. Don't be silly. Commented May 26, 2012 at 6:47
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    Yes, the comment was silly, but I don't see what's wrong with an occasional silly comment – not if it's only intended to amuse the community. After all, EL&U should be both interesting and fun. When I wrote my comment, the O.P. had written his question in ALL CAPS as well (it has since been edited), so essentially, most of the page looked like a lot of yelling was going on. Note, too, the main part of my comment (the part outside the parentheses) supports what you originally wrote. I meant no harm.
    – J.R.
    Commented May 26, 2012 at 10:53

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