0

Is the sentence

We either learn a lesson, or we reach the point.

grammatically correct?

I ran a few grammar checking sites and it all came out clear but because of parallelism shouldn't the sentence be "Either we ... or ..."?

New contributor
0825 ATC is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering. Check out our Code of Conduct.
10
  • Please clarify your specific problem or provide additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it's hard to tell exactly what you're asking.
    – Community Bot
    Commented Jul 9 at 14:48
  • 2
    Why shouldn't it be correct? (It doesn't make much sense to me, but that's nothing to do with grammar, it's because I've no idea what point you're reaching.)
    – Stuart F
    Commented Jul 9 at 14:55
  • 1
    You misunderstood. Either sets up a pair that needs to be parallel. But that 'fork' can sit either (at the start) or (in the middle) of the sentence. Commented Jul 9 at 16:15
  • 2
    @FumbleFingers It might make more sense if we knew the context that defines "the point".
    – Barmar
    Commented Jul 9 at 17:37
  • 1
    If I were editing this sentence for a print publication, I would organize the wording in one of two ways: "Either we learn a lesson or we reach the point" or "We either learn a lesson or reach the point." Both are parallel constructions as I have framed them: "Either X or Y" attaches two parallel phrases that start with a pronoun to the word either; "Either we X or Y" attaches two parallel phrases that start with a verb to the word we.
    – Sven Yargs
    Commented Jul 9 at 18:29

1 Answer 1

0

No, I don't think that sentence is grammatically correct.

I re-read the sentence as it is and others ways to possibly write it. I feel it is written and sounds correct but there is a punctuation error in that sentence. There shouldn't be a comma between the words lesson and or. A sentence like "Either we learn a lesson, gain a blessing or reach the point." that comma would be placed correctly. The last thing I feel that it's an incomplete sentence. That sentence would be grammatically correct if the point reached was known to make it a complete and the comprehension of it is better understood. It's like a story left unfinished with no ending. The conclusion to how the story ends is misunderstood, confusing to the audience like an open-ended story and leaves the questions of how the story ends. If it was written like "Either we learn a lesson or reach the point of no return.", it would be complete.

New contributor
Katrina M.R.A.H is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering. Check out our Code of Conduct.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.