3

I have heard people say this, and finally have a written example: "The lower grade wood would go into window frames." https://thehistoricdistrict.org/viewtopic.php?t=304

2
  • 2
    I sense an elliptical making: The lower grade wood would go into [making] window frames. Commented May 26 at 18:34
  • What makes you think it can be used in the sense "made of" from the example you provide? Commented May 27 at 13:51

1 Answer 1

11

The phrasal verb go into is used in the sense of be used in quite frequently. An example found on line is

Steel production accounts for around 12% of global carbon emissions and over one tenth of global steel production by volume goes into the automotive sector.

It is not used to mean be made of.

11
  • 5
    It's used even more frequently of time, money, and effort ("Three years' work went into...", "All his money goes into...", etc). But perfectly fine with other resources and raw materials.
    – Stuart F
    Commented May 26 at 11:55
  • 2
    The nearest mention of this sense (for materials) I can find in the usual sources is << go into something ... [5]: To be added to something: • In this cake recipe, the sugar goes into the batter before the flour. >> [ American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs.] But this is subtly different; OP's usage means 'be a component of some manufactured (large scale implied) item'. Commented May 26 at 14:53
  • @EdwinAshworth That's close to literal, the sugar is moving into the batter.
    – Barmar
    Commented May 27 at 4:45
  • @Barmar: The example is. 'Flour, eggs, butter and sugar go into most cakes' obviously = 'Flour, eggs, butter and sugar go into making most cakes'. I'd have added an answer if I'd found a dictionary definition that was spot on. CD has 'If time, money, or effort goes into a product or activity, it is used when producing or doing it: A considerable amount of time and effort has gone into this exhibition.' Commented May 27 at 13:21
  • 2
    @EdwinAshworth, our exchange motivated me to find a good citation of the usage, and ironically I found one nearly identical to the one I had made up. My answer has been edited accordingly. Commented May 27 at 16:15

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.