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Is there any way of describing the attempt of refute rather than just saying refuting? In conjunction, I would usually just further elaborate upon the verb with more descriptors and/or visualization, but since I'd fancy a tad in the interest of poeticism, is there a word that encompasses the idea of this en masse?

"   Heed to their calls—It serves you no purpose.
    Not but a scree refuting despite,
    There will never be salvation
    In cryptic conversation. "

I'd like to emphasize the action of attempting to refute in order to portray the difficulty of trying to go against the "nature of negativity" explained within my poem. (Line 2 of the stanza)

(Side note: please don't be too harsh if what I'm asking seems to be stupid or naive, as for some reason I am genuinely struggling to locate a word worth of value equivalent to such. Also, it's my first post B))

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3 Answers 3

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“dispute” captures the idea of trying to refute without having gotten there.

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  • ... and has the advantage of not having much of an (if any) overlap with 'disprove'. Commented May 25 at 22:40
  • Hm, interesting idea. I must say though similar to a massive con of the term "rebut," the term is frankly as simple to be overlooked as its standard denotation. BUT, this one seems to "capture the idea without actually achieving it" better than "rebut." I think this word is far superior! Thanks for the suggestion; I think I will proceed with your answer from here.
    – My Info
    Commented May 29 at 19:03
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You could use the word

rebut
to argue that a statement or claim is not true

from Cambridge Dictionary.

The difference between rebut and refute is that the first is an attempt, the second is a supposed statement of fact, or a denial.

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    There is a considerable overlap. Britannica has 'rebut: to prove (something) is false by using arguments or evidence.' But the CD definition is also valid. Commented May 12 at 19:28
  • In most cases I would agree, but I feel as if (similar to Edwin Ashworth's comment) the word would be more likely than not overlooked as its basic denotation. I am absolutely not denying that it does have functionality, it just seems not to be the word I am looking for to replace "refute."
    – My Info
    Commented May 13 at 14:56
  • @MyInfo Since the meaning is correct, you could still accept this answer even if you don't use it.
    – Lambie
    Commented May 15 at 12:31
  • @Lambie That quite literally goes against the entire usage of the "Accept" button.
    – My Info
    Commented May 15 at 23:58
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    After prolonged thought, I have decided this will likely be the best answer we can unanimously concur. It seems there are no other verbs that "perfectly" (to some degree rather) comply with what I seek out to embody.
    – My Info
    Commented May 19 at 17:48
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"Debunk" fits that description in modern American colloquial English.

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    To debunk would be to refute powerfully more than just trying to. Commented May 15 at 15:57
  • Agreed, @YosefBaskin
    – My Info
    Commented May 15 at 23:59

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