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"Albeit" can be followed by adverbs, adjectives, and nouns that are used in a adjectival manner:

The journey was fun, albeit short

I decided to change my major, albeit reluctantly

It was a fun journey, albeit a protracted one

She accepted the offer, albeit with hesitation

Can "albeit" ever be followed by a full sentence, effectively making it synonymous to "though"? For example

?The dish was lacking spices, albeit the lack of salt annoyed him much more.

I have seen such usages in the wild, but they strike me as incorrect.

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  • 4
    'albeit' has no place in the example sentence: you've shifted from spice to seasoning in general. "The dish was lacking spices, although the lack of salt annoyed him much more." Mar 31 at 20:47
  • 2
    Merriam-Webster has the example "customers seemed generally cheery, albeit some were more cautious than others …"—Cynthia Clark, Publishers Weekly, 26 Jan. 1998
    – Stuart F
    Mar 31 at 21:59
  • How, to you, is 'albeit' grammatically different from 'although'? Apr 1 at 19:45
  • 1
    Albeit awkward, this sentence seems permissible under most circumstances.
    – FeRD
    Apr 2 at 3:18

2 Answers 2

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Eoghan Ryan, at Scribbr {2022) essentially proscribes the usage you ask about:

Albeit is a conjunction meaning ‘even though’ or ‘although’....

It is used to introduce a subordinate clause that qualifies or contrasts with the information given in the main clause of a sentence.

Examples: ‘Albeit’ in a sentence

  • Ted found the motivational speaker inspiring, albeit a little preachy.
  • Karla is very nice, albeit sometimes stubborn.
  • My car is dependable, albeit old.
  • Sebastian is an artist, albeit an unpopular one.

Correspondingly, none of Cambridge Dictionary's twenty-odd examples and none of Collins's twelve or so are of the form.

But Merriam-Webster sees fit to cite a sentence where 'albeit' is followed by an independent clause:

Examples of albeit in a Sentence ...

  • … customers seemed generally cheery, albeit some were more cautious than others … —Cynthia Clark, Publishers Weekly, 26 Jan. 1998

(It has the definition

even though; although,

but fails to comment on the different usages of [even] though:

  • He was tall though thin.
  • He was tall, though he was very supple.                   )

I'd say this is a very niche usage (albeit is fairly rare in any case). I'd avoid it, in line with the guidance in Wiktionary's usage note:

The word albeit historically also introduced an independent clause as although does (as in ... Shakespeare ...); however after the Early Modern English period, it ceased to do so, and today only introduces a noun phrase, adjectival phrase, adverbial phrase, or dependent clause.

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Can "albeit" ever be followed by a full sentence?

Yes

The journey was fun, albeit it was a short one

I decided to change my major, albeit the decision was made reluctantly

It was a fun journey, albeit it was a protracted one. - This is the same as the first, isn't it?

She accepted the offer, albeit that acceptance came with with hesitation.

And from published sources:

1948 We know them all affectionately as ‘gums’, albeit the botanists admit the name only to those species whose bark..is smooth to the base. B. Cronin, How runs Road 68

2004 ‘Bridges’ is a..delight..albeit one has to be ready for the jazzified force of drummer and percussionist Jamey Haddad. JazzTimes April 115/1

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  • Some of those are pretty broken sentences, though. 1 and 3, especially. Typical construction would be something more like, "It was a fun, albeit short, journey." or "It was a fun journey, albeit a protracted one." I don't think I'd ever expect to see "albeit it...", since albeit's earliest roots trace back to Ye Olde English's "although it be". So there's already an implicit "it" there. In fact, GCIDE has a Tennyson quote that demonstrates its use at the start of a sentence: "Albeit so masked, Madam, I love the truth." (Although it be so masked, Madam, I love the truth.)
    – FeRD
    Apr 11 at 22:26
  • @FeRD I don't think I'd ever expect to see "albeit it..., You should (a) understand the dictum "When enough people are wrong, they are right" (b) you should expect to see it in a Google Books search (google.com/…) (c) although it be is not Old English. (d) language changes over time.
    – Greybeard
    Apr 12 at 9:54

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