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These ‘near-Earth objects’, or NEOs, are the size of mountains and include anything within 50 million kilometers of Earth’s orbit.

The previous extract comes from a scientific divulgation article. What brought the question about is the part where it says "... include anything within 50 million kilometers of earth's orbit".

Exactly the part where I have trouble understanding is where it says "anything within 50 million kilometers of earth's orbit" When it says "of earth's orbit" it means about the distance as if it were using the preposition "from" instead of "of" or simply means that anything inside the limits of the path of the earth's orbit that measures that?

I am asking this because in all my years of English I have not seen a construction like this if "of" is being used instead of "from".

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    We don't say divulgation in English. That's Spanish (divulgación). We say: popularization of science, for example. To be "within some distance of something else". He was within five feet of the house when the car hit him. But: He was five feet from the house when the car hit him. [This question will probably be moved to ELL]. He was within half an hour of winning the race. The word within governs these usages.
    – Lambie
    Mar 22 at 18:52
  • By comparison with of, within [distance] from [place] is uncommon. But focusing just on from, it's obviously far from unknown. It was 5-10 times more common a century or two ago, though, so unless you want to sound Victorian, you should avoid using from in such contexts today. Mar 22 at 19:56

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