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If so, what is the subject that agrees with the boldface pronoun it in the passage?

Matt had never mentioned his father or what he did, because I guess I’d never asked, or maybe I had and didn’t remember during all the long and aimless conversations over our year together, in which topics never got personal until the final week, when I’d pushed it, so of course I didn’t know what Matt’s dad did for a living...

(The Shards: A novel, by Bret Easton Ellis)

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    it is not a subject, it is a direct object. "it" is refers to the topic of Matt's father.
    – Lambie
    Feb 18 at 16:55
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    Yes, topic. Also, the personal. And since You're pushing it is phrasal for pushing your luck, you can read "I pushed [my luck]. The whole sentence is a stream of consciousness - polite for a major run-on. Feb 18 at 18:01
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    @Lambie Yes. But are there not contexts in which 'it' is virtually impersonal as an object, for instance "your'e pushing it too far" just as it can be an impersonal subject, as in "it's starting to rain" or "It's getting rather cold in here."?
    – Tuffy
    Feb 18 at 19:12
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    'Semi-referential "it" ' (where the 'referent' is deducible). But 'it' in: the conversation? Y the common "Don't push it" is not as easily deducible: the conversation? Your luck? The boat [out]? It's certainly not referential it (where the referent has a corresponding noun etc earlier in the sentence / dialogue). Feb 18 at 19:28
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    I think "push it" can be considered a phrasal verb or idiom, and there's no direct referent. When you're asking for information and they're reluctant to answer, "push it" means repeating until they give in.
    – Barmar
    Feb 19 at 16:46

2 Answers 2

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Yosef Baskin provides the answer in

Yes, topic. Also, the personal. And since You're pushing it is phrasal for pushing your luck, you can read "I pushed [my luck]." The whole sentence is a stream of consciousness - polite for a major run-on. – To push one's luck / to push it

This is an idiom.

The it/luck refers to the success that the narrator has already had from his friendship.

OED

P.3.d. to push (also crowd, ride, etc.) one's luck: to take a risk on the assumption that one will continue to be successful or in favour; to rely on good luck.

2012 ‘You phoned her again? You're pushing your luck,’ Karen said. D. Park, Light of Amsterdam ii. 31

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No, the pronoun it does not agree with any subject in this sentence (if by 'subject' you mean the syntactic definition of that word). I've marked all of the syntactic subjects in the quoted portion of the sentence with squiggly brackets:

{Matt} had never mentioned his father or what {he} did, because {I} guess {I}’d never asked, or maybe {I} had and didn’t remember during all the long and aimless conversations over our year together, in which {topics} never got personal until the final week, when {I}’d pushed it, so of course {I} didn’t know what {Matt’s dad} did for a living...

None of these are coreferential with the pronoun it. Pronouns do not always refer to a previous noun/noun phrase.

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