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Russo- is a synonym indicating pertaining to Russia. Anglo- indicates pertaining to England. Is there, or can one create or recommend a prefix which generalises to specifically means one's own race or country?

For example, somebody may wish to argue, rightly or wrongly, that some country (say UK for example) is more institutionally Anglophobic than Russia is Russophobic. What [prefix]-phobic could cover the general case of pertaining to discriminating against one's own race or nation?

The best I have come up with is Indigenophobic.

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    Oikophobia (Greek: oîkos, 'house, household' + phóbos, 'fear'; related to domatophobia and ecophobia) is an aversion to a home environment, or an abnormal fear (phobia) of one's home and also a tendency to criticize or reject one's own culture and praise other cultures. (Wikipedia)
    – Gio
    Commented Jan 2 at 16:30
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    Similar, but not about race specifically: Word meaning the reverse of 'xenophobia', to indicate an irrational fear or hatred of one's own countrymen
    – Laurel
    Commented Jan 2 at 16:50
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    @jsw29 Only if we assume the term "race" was intended to be used loosely. Perhaps the best option would be for OP to remove "or country" from this question (since an answer that only covers race wouldn't be appropriate on the other question) or specify why "oikophobia" from the other question doesn't work. Now, if oikophobia is the term they're looking for, the question here should be closed as a duplicate.
    – Laurel
    Commented Jan 2 at 20:08
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    @Laurel, it's not just the OP's use of 'or country', but also the examples (Russo-, Anglo-), that indicate that the OP's focus is not on race, in the now-dominant sense of that word.
    – jsw29
    Commented Jan 2 at 20:48
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    @it'sahirecarbaby What's wrong with stemming words like patriot and nationalist for your cultural alienation thing? Does self-hatred on a national or racial or arbitrary type-group basis really need a new combining form that has never existed before and which nobody knows what means? Why can't you just spell it out in simple multiword English instead of plucking obscure Greek terms out of Homer nobody will have heard of? Plus what's wrong with reusing autophobia? Yes, it means something else but people will think it means fear of cars so it doesn't matter if you give it a new sense. :)
    – tchrist
    Commented Jan 3 at 13:33

2 Answers 2

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Patriaphobia

It was formed from patria (a somewhat obscure word of Latin origin that means "one's own country") and phobia (which we also get from Latin). Its main claim to fame is that it was used by Pope Francis:

But he cautioned against "fantasies of patriaphobia," saying that he would visit Argentina when the opportunity presented itself and hinting that the trip could also include Uruguay and southern Brazil. —CNA

It's also been used in a couple of older sources, such as The Pillar of Fire (1915).

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  • Nice, thanks. Patria must be same derivation as patriot. Is there a reason for patriaphobia over patriophobia or even patriphobia? As "patria" (as meaning of country) is derived from, and indicates of the father such as in patriarchy. I wonder is there a way to discriminate of own country specifically? Commented Jan 3 at 16:11
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    The term patriphobia is in use, but half the time is used to refer to a fear/hatred of fathers.
    – Laurel
    Commented Jan 3 at 16:36
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"One's own" has a prefix in latin of proprio-. This is evident in the words proprietor and proprioception, and in a modified form in property.

"Race" in latin comes as its own prefix: gen-, the word genus meaning race.

Try combining them like so: propriogenus.

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    This could be a word for the phenomenon in question, but is it? If somebody used that word, without explaining what its intended meaning is, do you think he would be understood?
    – jsw29
    Commented Jan 2 at 18:14
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    @Lambie, the OP presumably wants a word to use in communication. For a word to be suitable for that purpose, it needs to be understood.
    – jsw29
    Commented Jan 2 at 18:25
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    Inventions, strings not in the lexicon, are expressly off-topic on ELU. I'd not call it a word. Productivity is not absolute in English. Commented Jan 2 at 19:25
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    A fabulous answer. So it would be propriogenophobia. There should be special cases where invention should be on-topic here, something I will propose in meta. If you propose propriogenophobia, I can accept your answer. Commented Jan 3 at 11:48
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    @EdwinAshworth the proposed prefix is within the lexicon, and the dicsussion of prefixes is on-topic therefore your objection fails. Commented Jan 3 at 12:00

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