0

I've grown up using hopscotch as an adjective and I'm wondering if anyone else also has?

For example, "Stop being hopscotch with the shoveling," or "Stop doing hopscotch work," would mean stop jumping around from easy task to easy task and just get all of the work done in the expected order.

It could also refer to the appearance of something, like "your garden layout kind of hopscotch" - all over the place/mismatched.

3
  • 1
    I've never heard this usage. You don't say where in the world you grew up. Commented Dec 12, 2023 at 9:20
  • I can't find it in OED, M-W, or Green's, but it could be considered a fairly obvious extended use of the noun.
    – Stuart F
    Commented Dec 12, 2023 at 9:36
  • 5
    It sounds almost like a mis-hearing of hodge-podge. Is hopscotch used commonly in your district with the meaning you described?
    – Peter
    Commented Dec 12, 2023 at 9:59

1 Answer 1

1

"Stop doing hopscotch work," would mean stop jumping around from easy task to easy task and just get all of the work done in the expected order.

This seems to be part of your idiolect rather than a common term. Moreover, as BillJ points out above, you are using "hopscotch" as a attributive noun rather than an adjective.

I think the nearest valid construction would be "Stop grasshoppering!"

OED: To grasshopper

4.b. intransitive. figurative, with reference to moving quickly, suddenly, or erratically from one thing to another.

1919 Observe their eyes grass-hoppering here and there around the page until they light on an appealing tidbit. M. K. Powers in Business November 18/1

1966 My mind travelled up to the Bonnards, and grasshoppered from them to Alison. -- J. Fowles, Magus xxxvii. 230

2005 This is how he speaks: tangential, disconnected, grasshoppering from thought to thought. Guardian (Nexis) 30 July (Travel section) 2

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.