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A is a literary word but B is casual and everyday word.

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    You need the is, and you need a before word, but not if you're gonna leave out word. Commented Sep 3, 2023 at 21:59
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    You need a before casual. Commented Sep 3, 2023 at 22:12
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    Casual and everyday are not both needed. If you want shorter, look there. Commented Sep 4, 2023 at 3:40
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    Now I got it. You want to remove is and word. Yes, you can: A is a literary word, but B, casual. Note the comma that signals the gap. Commented Sep 4, 2023 at 3:42
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    It's getting quite tiresome to spend time on an answer only to have the question closed. Is it really more important to close questions than not to alienate contributors? Couldn't the question be bumped to ELL? Not sure what kind of "research" you'd expect the questioner to provide.
    – TimR
    Commented Sep 4, 2023 at 12:00

2 Answers 2

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A is a literary word but B is casual and everyday word.

You can omit word.

A is a literary word but B is casual and everyday.

Note that "everyday" is being used there in a somewhat casual manner. It isn't usually deployed as a predicate adjective after the copula. You could surround it in quotation marks:

A is a literary word but B is casual and "everyday".

Or you could omit word twice and put the words in question inside quotation marks:

"A" is literary but "B" is casual.

Or you could omit the first instance of word and repeat the article:

"A" is a literary but "B" is a casual word.

And you could omit the first word and the second is:

"A" is a literary but "B" a casual word.

That last version is itself a tad literary in style.

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According to hints, the following two sentences are not correct then. [Post updated]

A is a literary word but B is a casual and everyday.

A is a literary word, but B, casual and everyday.

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    "a casual and everyday" isn't idiomatic.
    – TimR
    Commented Sep 4, 2023 at 10:29
  • According to Yosef Baskin and Peter Shor, but you misunderstood what PS was saying, You need a before casual he meant the example sentence should have "a casual word" and you should read Baskin's suggestion more carefully, he explained: A is a literary word, but B, casual. which is perfectly grammatical. Your examples are not.
    – Mari-Lou A
    Commented Sep 4, 2023 at 11:57

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