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I am wondering whether it is possible to use “inasmuch” without “as” right after. Consider the following sentences:

This paper agrees with author (year), inasmuch it reaches a similar conclusion.

This paper agrees with author (year), inasmuch as it reaches a similar conclusion.

I am wondering whether one is correct while the other one isn’t, or whether both are correct. So, in other words:

Can I use “inasmuch” instead of “inasmuch as”? If no, when should I use the former and when should I use the latter?

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  • 1
    If you consider inasmuch as conveys "in as much as," you need the second as. But "agrees with" and "reaches a similar conclusion" are the same. All you need is "This paper agrees with the conclusion of author (year). " Aug 25, 2023 at 14:25
  • I don’t understand why the question is closed. I just want to know whether I can generally use ‘inasmuch’ instead of ‘inasmuch as’. I just gave a sentence that was meant to be an example.
    – EoDmnFOr3q
    Aug 25, 2023 at 15:19
  • 2
    See this usage chart comparing frequency of occurrence for both inasmuch and inasmuch as. The fact that they're both about equally common clearly shows that there are next to no written instances of inasmuch that aren't followed by as. I certainly can't think of any valid context where you could omit as. Aug 25, 2023 at 15:27
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    It's exactly the same with my preferred alternative insofar as EXCEPT the full Oxford English Dictionary has a separate entry (with usage citation) for insofar as well as insofar as, but they have no separate entry or citations for inasmuch without as. Partly because of that inexplicable (to me) difference, I'm voting to reopen the question. Aug 25, 2023 at 15:33
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    No, it is not possible, unless you want to employ an obsolete usage. Aug 26, 2023 at 2:18

2 Answers 2

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The use of inasmuch without as means likewise, and that usage left the building with Alexander Pope (1688–1744). The OED labels it obsolete:

inasmuch adv.
. . .
II.
Without as.
II.3.
† In an equal or like degree, likewise. Obsolete.
1732   The wisest Man that ever was, and inasmuch the richest, beyond all peradventure, was a Jew. (A. Pope, Strange Relation E. Curll in J. Swift et al., Misc.: 3rd Volume ii. 47)

Source: Oxford English Dictionaryinasmuch (login required)

If you were to use it any anyway, you would need to use it as you might use likewise. Maybe:

This paper agrees with author and inasmuch reaches a similar conclusion.

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I searched the Corpus of Contemporary American English for inasmuch *:

phrase count
INASMUCH AS 1211
INASMUCH , 9
INASMUCH THAT 4
INASMUCH THEN 3
INASMUCH IT 2
INASMUCH HE 2
INASMUCH WE 1
INASMUCH THE 1
INASMUCH FOUNDATION 1
INASMUCH FEMALE 1
INASMUCH ALSO 1
INASMUCH A 1
INASMUCH 20TH 1

Almost all the hits are for "inasmuch as" (including some in the second row which were interrupted by commas). I would not use "inasmuch" unless followed by "as".

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