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I'm curious about the acceptability of using the adverb "too" in the middle of a sentence right after the contraction "there's." Specifically, I want to know whether "too" can function similarly to the adverb "also" in this construction. If this usage is not widely accepted in standard English, I would like to know if it would be suitable for creative writing, such as songs, poetry etc.

Here are a few examples:

  • "There's, too, a sadness in her eyes that betrays her cheerful facade."
  • "Not only do I find it creepy, but there's, too, a hidden secret that lies within the walls of that old mansion."
  • "Apart light and matter, there's, too, the unseen."

I would greatly appreciate insights on whether this usage is considered acceptable and if there are any specific guidelines or considerations for employing it in creative works. Additionally, any examples or references from literature, music, or film that illustrate this usage would be helpful.

Thanks in advance!

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  • I don't know the history and I do not think I've seen it before but I like it. Commas are always discussed as being over used but I think you've got it about right. Looking forward to an answer.
    – Elliot
    Jun 13, 2023 at 3:25
  • There's a slight risk that in seeing too in that context (especially without commas which I'd normally counsel against) that the reader might think it an intensifier or a mistake for something like "there's too great a sadness in her eyes". But maybe you desire that effect.
    – Stuart F
    Jun 13, 2023 at 8:22
  • Use also instead. There's no difference in meaning, and it's not confusable. Jun 13, 2023 at 17:06
  • The too is not your problem. There's too in a lyric may be heard as Their stew, with the recipe a hidden secret, no kidding. Jun 13, 2023 at 21:02

2 Answers 2

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Using too like that is fine, but it has a rather formal, literary flavour which contrasts oddly with the informal there's. It would sound much more natural to say, for example

Apart from light and matter, there is, too, the unseen.

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  • +1 for spotting the missing "from", not to mention that "I find it creepy" in the OP's example is quite informal too.
    – Mari-Lou A
    Jun 13, 2023 at 8:42
  • Would it sound unnatural to omit the word "from" in the sentence, let’s say in a “casual conversation”?
    – TonyCrudor
    Jun 13, 2023 at 15:00
  • Yes, it would. You could say "Light and matter apart, there is also..." (I don't know why also sounds better than too, but it does). Jun 13, 2023 at 20:06
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At least to my ears, 'there's too', with or without commas, for 'there's also', sounds unnatural.

Admittedly, Google ngrams show a considerable number of returns for "there 's too":

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but the first 50, at least, are false positives, using 'too' as part of 'too much / many / great / big / few / little ...'. This is also true for the first 50 hits in a Google search for << "there's too" -"much love" >>.

But it must be added that only one of the first 50 examples given in Google ngrams of the string 'there is too' is of the 'there is also' usage.

I'd say that there needs to be some stress on the copula (is / are) for the string to sound natural mid-sentence, which argues against the use of the contracted form.

Use of 'too' in the 'in addition' sense in the sentence-initial or mid-sentence positions is probably less idiomatic in the UK than in the States. I'd rank idiomaticity in the UK as follows:

  • Apart [from] light and matter, there's/there is the unseen, too. (both fully idiomatic)
  • There is, too, a sadness in her eyes that betrays her cheerful facade. (fully idiomatic)
  • Not only do I find it creepy, but there is, too, a hidden secret that lies within the walls of that old mansion. (reasonable, but could be better balanced, 'but I also ...') (lacking the bracketing commas, hard to parse and rather unnatural sounding)
  • There is too a sadness in her eyes that betrays her cheerful facade. (sounds unnatural to my ears)
  • Apart from light and matter, there is, too, the unseen. (sounds clumsy; written, has comma-clutter)
  • Not only do I find it creepy, but there's, too, a hidden secret that lies within the walls of that old mansion. (sounds unnatural)
  • Apart from light and matter, there's, too, the unseen. (sounds most unnatural)

.......................

Omitting commas is more reasonable where independent clauses are not too long:

  • There is too a growing sense of social unrest. (fully idiomatic)
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