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Morphologically speaking, I suppose this is the practice of adding meaningless affixes in order to make the word appear more grandiose.

Perhaps more common in AAVE, especially the word 'edumecate'. Often used to satirical or mocking effect.

Alternatives include educamate, edumacate, like for example in MF DOOM's song Vomitspit:

Well edumacated, he heard it when he meditated / In deep theta, let her hate, the creep played her

I feel like this is a practice common enough to warrant its own name as a discrete stylistic device. But I can't find it.

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  • I now see that I asked a similar (but different) question 5 years ago; it is probably related to eye dialect
    – Maarten
    Mar 29, 2023 at 9:44
  • While "philosphization" might be the result of an AAVE mispronunciation and thus be eye-dialect, edumecate is a new word. I think your question may need more detail.
    – Andrew Leach
    Mar 29, 2023 at 9:54
  • Perhaps I've wrongly generalized, if you do not recognize the same pattern. (I suppose cacography & sensational spelling might fit the bill.)
    – Maarten
    Mar 29, 2023 at 9:55
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    It's a subdivision of gobbledygook. Stanley Unwin used such language (Wikipedia), often less easy to interpret. Mar 29, 2023 at 10:09
  • For neologism (new words) used by technocrats, you may refer to Orwellian newspeak.
    – Graffito
    Mar 29, 2023 at 10:21

3 Answers 3

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According to the following site, it is a way to Homerize words, that is to treat or put it in a Homeric style.

Other examples include Gradumacation, Saxamophone, Trampampoline and Translamacation

"Can you edumacate me in the ways of the saxamophone?" "Let me translamacate it for you while we play on the trampampoline"

(slangdefine.org)

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  • 2
    Wow! Yes, exactly what I meant! Thank you. But it seems to be a neologism particular to this website?
    – Maarten
    Mar 29, 2023 at 9:57
  • Is this Homer as in Homer, or Homer as in Homer Simpson? Again, more detail is needed.
    – Andrew Leach
    Mar 29, 2023 at 9:57
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    Reckon: obviously Homer the poet, that is to render the word more epic or poetic (perhaps even to fit the metrum?)
    – Maarten
    Mar 29, 2023 at 10:04
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    I don't think it's obvious at all. The answer should demonstrate "Homeric style", not merely copy from a website which seems to have the reliability of Urban Dictionary.
    – Andrew Leach
    Mar 29, 2023 at 10:07
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    It does indeed to be niche to one-off. Looking up 'homerization', UD does offer a definition, but it's nothing to do with morphology. Mar 29, 2023 at 10:07
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In the Renaissance period it was fashionable to invent long or complicated words, mostly based on Latin. These days they are called inkhorn words or inkhornisms.

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Linguistic flatulence

would be a plain (if educated) English description of this phenomenon, although the term has a wider compass than this particular abomination.

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