0

In Game of Thrones, season 4, ep.8 around 37:50, The Hound says:

[...]and his travelling companion Arya Stark.

He pronounces it like "Aryer Stark". It seems to be a similar concept as an intrusive r, but here the /r/ sound is followed by a consonant.

Could someone share any insight of whether this is a rule, or maybe a question of accent or something else?

3
  • Wikipedia: The phenomenon of intrusive R is an overgeneralizing reinterpretation of linking R into an r-insertion rule that affects any word that ends in the non-high vowels /ə/, /ɪə/, /ɑː/, or /ɔː/; when such a word is closely followed by another word beginning in a vowel sound, an /r/ is inserted between them, even when no final /r/ was historically present. "Stark" doesn't begin with a vowel sound. Mar 7, 2023 at 18:06
  • 3
    One thing to consider about this particular example is that the actor who play The Hound, Rory McCann, naturally speaks with a Scottish accent, but is using some other accent in this role.
    – Juhasz
    Mar 7, 2023 at 18:55
  • @Juhaxz: Exactly. This is a mistake made by a rhotic speaker trying to talk with a non-rhotic accent. A native non-rhotic speaker of English would say Arya Stark. Mar 19, 2023 at 10:55

1 Answer 1

-1

This is an extreme case of intrusive r; it is not at all typical of intrusive r.

(Wikipedia) The phenomenon of intrusive R is an overgeneralizing reinterpretation of linking R into an r-insertion rule that affects any word that ends in the non-high vowels /ə/, /ɪə/, /ɑː/, or /ɔː/; when such a word is closely followed by another word beginning in a vowel sound, an /r/ is inserted between them, even when no final /r/ was historically present. For example, the phrase bacteria in it would be pronounced /bækˈtɪəriərˌɪnɪt/. The epenthetic /r/ can be inserted to prevent hiatus (two consecutive vowel sounds).

In extreme cases an intrusive R can follow a reduced schwa, such as for the example if you hafta[r], I’ll help and in the following examples taken from the native speech of English speakers from Eastern Massachusetts: I’m gonna[r]ask Adrian, t[ər]add to his troubles, a lotta[r]apples and the[r]apples. A related phenomenon involves the dropping of a consonant at the juncture of two words and the insertion of an r in its place, sometimes this occurs in conjunction with the reduction of the final vowel in the first word to a schwa: examples of this are He shoulda[r]eaten and I saw[r]’m (for I saw them)

11
  • Am I missing something? Is "intrusive r" even possible at all before a consonant? (in OP's case, the consonant cluster st). Mar 7, 2023 at 18:02
  • I agree with your statement, but I don't think this reference describes the case of "Arya[r]Stark". All the cases described there, even the extreme ones, still have the r intruding between two vowel sounds. This example seems similar to, but not quite the same as the "r-insertion" you'll rarely hear in some American English accents: english.stackexchange.com/questions/531737/…
    – Juhasz
    Mar 7, 2023 at 18:05
  • @FumbleFingers In my opinion this is the same context as indicated in the second part of the reference ("In extreme cases…"): the comma indicates a break in the flow, so does a following syllable that begins with a consonant. This type of intrusion is not typical because it is in no way induced by a pseudo r-liaison. Personnally, I wouldn't classify it a being r-intrusion (merely spurious pronunciation).
    – LPH
    Mar 7, 2023 at 18:10
  • @Juhasz Yes, all are followed by a vowel, except the first, where a comma is equivalent to a following consonant for the flow.
    – LPH
    Mar 7, 2023 at 18:15
  • 1
    I could imagine an actor with a rhotic accent trying to imitate a non-rhotic one might end up with something like this. Is the actor American?
    – alphabet
    Mar 7, 2023 at 19:37

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.