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I'm looking for a way to express the gradual reduction in a division between two groups similar to the one used in this sentence: "The dichotomy between reliable and false information has gradually eroded to the point where ..."

This is meant to be a university-level essay but I am unable to determine such a word or expression to replace "gradual erosion of the barrier"

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    A dichotomy is not a quantity to decline. Maybe its extremes soften. Nov 6 at 18:43
  • The dichotomy between A and B has gradually eroded to the point where//to erode.
    – Lambie
    Nov 6 at 19:12
  • When you edited your question, you took my suggestion and now want to change that? You could at least give me credit for suggesting erode.
    – Lambie
    Nov 6 at 20:41
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    Edwin Ashworth has picked a good word, but you need to change a couple of other words: The distinction between reliable and false information has gradually become blurred, to the point where ... (Blurred is a past participle adjective here.) Nov 6 at 22:43

4 Answers 4

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There has been a blurring of the distinction between the two once (considered) disjoint categories.

blur [verb] ...

... to make the difference between two things less clear, or to make it difficult to see the exact truth about something:

  • This film blurs the line/distinction/boundary between reality and fantasy.

[Cambridge Dictionary]

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You can simply use "boundaries have become compromised" or ""boundaries have collapsed".

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In scientific and technical contexts blurring/blurred the distinction is commonly used for such descriptions.

The OP may wish to retain their original sentence (with slight modification) and use either the verb "vanish" or the noun "vanishing point" instead of "erode" to make their point.

The distinction between reliable and false information has gradually vanished to the point where...

The distinction between reliable and false information has gradually reached vanishing point where...

Per Collins

If you say that something has reached vanishing point, you mean it has become very small or unimportant.

By 1973, this gap had narrowed almost to vanishing point.

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Morph (Wiktionary) Verb

  1. (colloquial, transitive, intransitive, computer graphics) To change shape, from one form to another, through computer animation.

  2. (science fiction, fantasy) To shapeshift.

  3. (by extension) To undergo dramatic change in a seamless and barely noticeable fashion.

    • e.g. The friendly person morphed into a devilish politician.

I like this other word better but "morph" is a better fit to your situation.

Transmogrify (Wiktionary)

  1. (transitive) To completely alter the form of.

  2. (intransitive) To completely alter one's form.

e.g.

But 'Hamilton,' directed by Thomas Kail and starring Mr. Miranda, might just be about worth it—at least to anyone who wants proof that the American musical is not only surviving but also evolving in ways that should allow it to thrive and transmogrify in years to come.

2015 August 5, “Review: `Hamilton,' Young Rebels Changing History and Theater”, in The New York Times:

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  • This downvote needs explanation.
    – banuyayi
    Nov 8 at 12:16
  • The second downvote needs explanation.
    – banuyayi
    Nov 9 at 8:05

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