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For an example like “Francis Bacon” vs “France is Bacon”, what is this called, and how can I find more common examples of them?

It comes up a lot in speech recognition machine learning, or simply hearing someone say something totally different than what they really said.

“Fresh Prince” and “for Resh prints” could be another

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The only term for this mishearing of a phrase that I'm aware of is:

Mondegreen: a word or phrase that results from a mishearing especially of something recited or sung.

This term originates from (and mainly pertains to) the mishearing of song lyrics/poems. Though the meaning is expanded to any mishearing of a phrase that results in the listener perceiving an entirely new phrase with distinct meaning. Though it makes sense that the origin is from song since a lot of liberties are taken with pronunciation to fit a meter or rhyme scheme.

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mondegreen

https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/mondegreen

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Homophonic (Wiktionary) (linguistics) Having the same sound; being homophones. Homophones can be letters, words or phrases (source: Wikipedia)

Soramimi (Wiktionary) A homophonic translation of a song lyric, typically humorous; a mondegreen.

Mondegreen had already been mentioned.

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