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As the title asks, is there any difference in meaning?
For instance, is there any difference in meaning between these two sentences?

The activity can be freely done in this room.
The activity can be done freely in this room.

Or in these, which has a slight variation:

He has done it freely.
He has freely done it.

I can't find any definition for either expression and looking at Google's n-gram, the prevalence of their usage has shifted and now "done freely" is the more common one.

Sometimes I feel like there's a subtle difference, but I can't really point it out and explain.

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  • Collins lists 5 senses for 'freely' and their distributions (favoured positions within a sentence) probably differ. I'd imagine that 'is available freely.' is greatly outperformed by 'is freely available.', but that 'freely drank.' (note the full stops) is a virtual non-show. Jul 30, 2023 at 14:23

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We are looking for things that doesn't actually exist. Placement of the adverb "freely" in relation to the main verb do not actually change the sentence' meaning. Consider the following two sentences.

The X brand alcohol can be freely drunk.

The X brand alcohol can be drunk freely.

A non native speaker would have to tremendously stretch the English language for the first sentence to mean "X brand alcohol is available for consumption for free (no payment needed)". A native speaker would simply say

The X brand alcohol can be drunk for free.

Edit: There is a little difference in OP example sentences.

"The activity can be freely done in this room" can imply both in this order

"There is no restriction, permission provided for activity in this room" and "There is no restriction as the room provides plenty of space, and possibly other environmental conditions, for the activity".

"The activity can be done freely in this room" can imply both in this order

"There is no restriction as the room provides plenty of space, and possibly other environmental conditions, for the activity" and "There is no restriction, permission provided for activity in this room".

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    I agree with your examples regarding the drink but in terms of the question I think there is a subtle difference. To me "The activity can be freely done in this room" suggests that there is open permission to do the activity in the room whereas "The activity can be done freely in this room" implies that the room provides plenty of space, and possibly other environmental conditions, for the activity.
    – BoldBen
    Nov 1, 2022 at 8:39
  • I agree with you mostly(meaning maximally). I have edited my answer to reflect that. (And I have borrowed phrases you have used)
    – banuyayi
    Nov 1, 2022 at 8:57
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    @banuyayi if you agree with Bold Ben, then the first sentence of your answer is wrong.
    – Greybeard
    Nov 1, 2022 at 13:00

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