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In the first chapter of Capital on page 126 (1990 Penguin Edition), a footnote is attached to the sentence, "The usefulness of a thing makes it a use-value."

In English writers of the seventeenth century we still often find the word 'worth' used for use-value and 'value' for exchange-value. This is quite in accordance with the spirit of a language that likes to use a Teutonic word for the actual thing, and a Romance word for its reflection.

Is this an actual linguistic phenomenon of English, and is it well-known? If so, what are some resources that I could read more about this?

The distinction between a "thing" and its "reflection" is a bit vague, so I'm not sure any example I could come up with would actually fit this observation. I found this Wikipedia list of Germanic and Latinate equivalences, but it doesn't seem particularly helpful in finding examples of this type.

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