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Could anyone tell me if the following sentence is correct? Do we need an and before funded?

The professor undertook the XXXXX research project, aiming at improving the efficiency of the YYYY system, funded by the National Research Agency.

2 Answers 2

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The sentence will be misunderstood without and, because then, by the proximity rule (see p. 11), the reduced relative funded by the National Research Agency will modify the noun system, not project as you seem to intend.

Your sentence contains 2 reduced relatives

  1. relative clause reduced to present participle:

[which is] aimed at improving the efficiency of the YYYY system

  1. relative clause reduced to past participle:

[which is] funded by the National Research Agency

In order for them to both modify project, you need the coordinating conjunction and before funded. Then there is no ambiguity.

Note that, as indicated in the comments, the idiomatic phrase is

(be) aimed at doing something

When you coordinate two reduced relatives by and, your sentence will be more successful if you reduce them both to the same kind of participle, (either past or present, mixing them can increase ambiguity and be less elegant).

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  • 1
    Now that you mention it, let's go with aimed at and funded by. Sep 25 at 13:41
  • Was so engrossed in linking the relatives that I missed that...
    – fev
    Sep 25 at 13:46
  • Is it to better to keep the comma before "and funded by"?
    – SoftTimur
    Sep 25 at 14:41
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    Yes, I would keep it, it prepares the reader for additional information.
    – fev
    Sep 25 at 14:44
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By switching the word phrases we could arrive at a better reconstruction of the sentence

  • The professor undertook the National Research Agency funded XXXXX research project, which aims at improving the efficiency of the YYYY system.

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