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During an email conversation with my professor, I ended the email by writing

Let me know your thoughts.

I forgot to add a "Please" with it. It’s probably silly, but I am worried thinking is "Let me know your thoughts" polite enough?

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Ashikur Rahman is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering. Check out our Code of Conduct.
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    It's perfectly fine in most contexts. Other ways to say it are "what do you think?" or "let me know what you think."
    – Barmar
    Sep 22 at 22:21
  • Yes, it depends on context ... what's gone before, and how close your relationship is. 'Would you please let me ...?' shows due deference. Sep 24 at 12:01
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    I’m voting to close this question because I believe it would would fit better on 'Interperson Skills.SE'. Sep 24 at 12:03

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It might depend on the professor and your relationship. It could possibly seem a bit too informal to some who appreciate more deference: I would appreciate knowing your thoughts on this. ‘Let me know’ is not showing a lot of deference. It is more likely to be said by one’s superior. But this is nitpicking. I was married to a professor for a long time and let’s just say, many are an odd lot. Don’t worry.

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Ytvireo is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering. Check out our Code of Conduct.
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Let me know your thoughts is slightly informal, and can be interpreted by some as having a tint of condescension. A decision maker, or an organiser of a project/programme etc. can say that to the others.

A safer expression for a student-teacher relationship is:

I would be grateful for any suggestions (you might have).

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It depends on who you are talking to. In some contexts it sounds a bit stilted (too formal). In others it might sound condescending. If said said this to my partner, she might be somewhat offended for that reason: it sounds 'de haut en bas' (that is, as if I am talking down to her/him <literally 'from a height downwards'>). If you are leading a seminar, chairing a meeting or making a proposal to colleagues in a matter in which you are taking a lead, you could say 'let me have your thoughts'. I wouldn't, but that is just a matter of personal style.

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  • This answer already implies that, but it should be made explicit: there is nothing impolite about this sentence itself. The message in which it appears, as a whole, may come across as polite or condescending or . . . , depending on other things that are said within it.
    – jsw29
    2 days ago

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