1

(1) He waited (for her) to be released.

Here, the construction for her can be left out without affecting the acceptability, only the semantic subject of be released is now he without for her.

Almost all verbs I can think of behave in a similar fashion, except for "call" as in (2):

(2) He called for her to be released.

Here, omitting for her renders the sentence ungrammatical in the same sense of the matrix verb, according to H&P's CGEL (page 1181, FN 7):*

(2') *He called to be released.

That is, a first group of verbs (e.g., wait and arrange) are followed by the pattern [for NP to VP] where for NP can be readily omitted without rendering the sentence ungrammatical or even changing the meaning of the matrix verb. And a second group of verbs (e.g., call) are followed by the pattern [for NP to VP] where for NP cannot be readily omitted without changing the meaning of the matrix verb.

I'd like to know what verbs (other than call) belong to the second group.

I'd also like to know if there are a third group of verbs that are followed by the pattern [for NP to VP] where for NP cannot be readily omitted without rendering the sentence ungrammatical.

And if so, I'd like to know what verbs belong to the third group.


*Here's the exact quote from CGEL:

Note by contrast that in the for construction, where the NP is not a complement of the matrix verb, it can normally be readily omitted (along with for):7

[31] i Max arranged for Kim to see a solicitor.

ii Max arranged to see a solicitor.

7An exception is call: He called for her to be released, but not *He called to be released. Note, however, that a reflexive is also normally excluded: *He called for himself to be released.

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  • Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat.
    – NVZ
    Sep 21, 2022 at 3:11

1 Answer 1

-3

Group 1: Meaning not changed

  • Lobby

    He lobbied (for her) to be released.

Group 2: Meaning changed or became meaningless, but still grammatically correct

  • Overlook

    He overlooked (for her) to be released.

  • Err

    He Erred (for her) to be released.

  • Shrug

    He shrugged (for her) to be released.

  • Neglect

    He neglected (for her) to be released.

  • Miscalculate

    He miscalculated (for her) to be released.

  • Repent

    He repented (for her) to be released.

Group 3: Meaning changed or became meaningless and/or Grammatically incorrect

  • Predict

    He predicted (for her) to be released.

  • Rule

    He ruled (for her) to be released.

  • Exculpate

    He exculpated (for her) to be released.

  • Opine

    He opined (for her) to be released.

  • Champion

    He championed (for her) to be released.

7
  • You can improve your answer by adding references and explaining why this is a good choice.
    – fev
    Aug 31, 2022 at 9:12
  • 1
    Which of the three groups are you suggesting the verb lobby belongs to?
    – JK2
    Sep 1, 2022 at 0:42
  • How will we know which group a verb belongs to? The groups seem random and overlapping.
    – Greybeard
    Sep 4, 2022 at 11:31
  • I do agree that the groups seem random and overlapping. And I answered before I sought clarification from JK2. And since I had not sought clarification, I assumed that @JK2 wanted examples of verbs which could be slotted into these three groups.
    – banuyayi
    Sep 4, 2022 at 19:12
  • @jk2 kindly restructure and make the question more clear/clearer. It will help us other members to try to answer asked questions. Why do you need the examples? It will help us provide better answers if we are made aware of the intent. I did not put this request in the comments to your question. Lots of bickering going on there. Kindly do however reformat your question to make it easier for us to attempt to answer.
    – banuyayi
    Sep 4, 2022 at 19:43

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