1

Is there a term for adverbs that are adverb-only words, not adverbs constructed by modifying an adjective?

In other words, in English adverbs can be created by adding -ly to an adjective, so for example, we might have "happy" (the adjective) and "happily" (the adverbial construction). There are some English adverbs, however, that we might call native adverbs that only function as adverbs and are not constructed from an adjective. An example of this kind of word is "soon".

Is there a term for adverbs that are native and not constructed from adjectives?

2
  • Adverbs like: ”just, quite, so, soon, too and very” are not directly related to adjectives, unlike most other adverbs.
    – user 66974
    Commented Aug 20, 2022 at 14:36
  • They're not all adverbs, either. Think of them as oddly-shaped gears in the grammatical machine. Soon is a temporal quantifier, for instance; it requires two references to time, like a perfect, with a quantification judgement that the difference is small. Just is another minimal quantifier (at least in its adverbial use -- there are a lot of others). Too is a negative intensifier and very is an intensifier. Adverb is a wastebasket category, and this is the ugly stuff that fell to the bottom. Commented Aug 20, 2022 at 14:58

1 Answer 1

-1

Is there a term for adverbs that are adverb-only words, not adverbs constructed by modifying an adjective?

No.

1
  • @Emma Dash Greybeard, et al, are doubtless correct but if in your academic works, you started to distinguish between 'pure' adverbs and however you might describe the others, would anyone mind? Might some take it up? Commented Sep 2, 2022 at 21:07

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.