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For example, being slapped with an unforeseen cost of selling an item making the money earned less enjoyable.

An expression for the unexpected cost raining on my parade, or for being too optimistic that I had overlooked those costs.

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    Short-lived joy/success maybe.
    – fev
    Jul 13 at 8:20
  • "Raining on one's parade" is pretty good. Depending on the context, the somewhat sarcastic expression "snatching defeat from the jaws of victory" (which reverses the usual order of "defeat" and "victory") could work. Jul 13 at 8:46
  • Ephemeral...... Jul 15 at 2:14

1 Answer 1

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Your enjoyable moment proved to be a chimera

Cambridge
a hope or dream that is very unlikely ever to come true

Collins
A chimera is an unrealistic idea that you have about something or a hope that you have that is unlikely to be fulfilled

Merriam Webster
an illusion or fabrication of the mind especially : an unrealizable dream

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  • I do not find chimera in related questions and answers on this site, so I believe the question is not a duplicate, and should not be closed.
    – Anton
    Jul 13 at 8:53
  • This isn't the right word for what the OP is looking for. A chimera doesn't exist in reality, but only in the mind, whereas what the question describes is a real thing the enjoyment of which is short-lived, i.e. ephemeral. Jul 15 at 4:53
  • @ChappoHasn'tForgottenMonica To what real thing do you refer? The question is about enjoyment. Enjoyment is in the mind, just as is a chimera.
    – Anton
    Jul 15 at 7:14
  • Quoting directly from the question – "For example, being slapped with an unforeseen cost of selling an item making the money earned less enjoyable." The "real thing" is (a) selling the item for profit, followed by (b) being "slapped" with unexpected costs. These events aren't in the mind. They're quite real. The pleasure is no chimera, it's quite real too – but it's ephemeral. Jul 15 at 8:03
  • @ChappoHasn'tForgottenMonica Clearly, our definitions of "real" are different. But nobody else seems to care so let's leave it at that.
    – Anton
    Jul 15 at 9:14

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