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I'm trying to find a way to communicate my role or position title in this situation.

A friend of mine wanted to start a small business using their knitting skills, but they didn't know how to make a budget, track orders, market themselves, etc. They asked for my help and I set up those pages and spreadsheets for them and gave them a short training on how everything works. I have no further involvement except to maintain and change the format of the spreadsheets as the small business continues to take off and I am not the owner, I helped for the experience.

Now I'm trying to write about it and I can't find a word or phrase that acts like a 'job title' that can fully or even partially encompass what my role was in getting the business off the ground. When I try to look for words, analyst or assistant come up, but the former feels too involved and the latter feels too vague because I helped out with a range of things.

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    I'd make up Business Strategist, and each verb becomes a bullet of accomplishment: designed and built the infrastructure, formatted, set budgets, maintained, trained. Jun 22 at 21:18
  • "Assistant" also undervalues your contribution and skills. While an "analyst" role may not include much analysis, it's still more about providing the information to guide decision-making than what you describe
    – Chris H
    Jun 24 at 6:15

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You sound like a "consultant" to me.

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user452623 is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering. Check out our Code of Conduct.
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    I like this. You could be more specific if you want and say "small business consultant," and then add details, talking about IT, spreadsheets, accounting, business plan -- all the buzz words. I think there will be a lot of demand for such a service. Jun 22 at 23:40
  • "Consultant" is also good if the OP was doing it as a favour or for a one-off payment or a promise. Many alternatives imply a salaried position
    – Chris H
    Jun 24 at 6:17

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