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Is it right to use the words "institute" and "college" in naming an educational institution namely "Institute of Public Policy & Leadership College"? It is an affiliated institution/college under a university.

It seems to me that one word is enough and the other is redundant.

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    Are you creating this name yourself or are you trying to understand someone else's name? If the former, English Language Learners is probably a better place to ask this. If the latter, what is the source? I'd say the problem is not redundancy of meaning, but overloading the grammar - either The place of America" or "America's Place", not "The Place of America's Place".
    – Mitch
    Jun 13 at 13:08
  • It is the latter: someone else's name.
    – rajankila
    Jun 13 at 13:16
  • +1 for a nicely worded new question ! Do you have a web-link of this College ? In case, we want to show that there are 2 Distinct Entities here, we may have to use this format.
    – Prem
    Jun 13 at 13:54
  • @rajankila Since this is a name you found somewhere, can you give the source? (a link to a website where this is used)
    – Mitch
    Jun 13 at 14:38
  • No results found for "Institute of Public Policy & Leadership College," but it sure looks redundant. Jun 13 at 14:46

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This title probably means:

Institute of Public Policy

and

Leadership College

If not, yes I agree that having these two words together in the same title is redunant.

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    +1 , Yes, There may be 2 Distinct Entities here : "Institute" == "organization to promote art, science" && "College" == "organization catering higher education" ....
    – Prem
    Jun 13 at 14:02
  • Chances are that there are that, at one level of organisational hierarchy, there are two entities here, which, at the next higher level, constitute one entity.
    – jsw29
    Jun 13 at 16:25

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