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Can the "is" in the following sentence be omitted?

"Those who think a cure for Alzheimer's Disease is a possibility must act now."

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“Is” may be omitted. The phrase “Alzheimer’s disease a possibility” then is a nominative absolute.

Merriam Webster
nominative absolute:
a construction in English consisting of a noun in the common case or a pronoun in the nominative case joined with a predicate that does not include a finite verb and functioning usually as a sentence modifier but also sometimes capable of being construed as the modifier of a particular word in the sentence (as her head erect in "she walked along, her head erect" or he being absent in "he being absent, no business was transacted")

Wikipedia gives a related account that shows the construct may be used anywhere within a sentence, as in your example.

wikipedia

In English grammar, a nominative absolute is a free-standing (absolute) part of a sentence that describes the main subject and verb. It consists of a noun in the common case or a pronoun in the nominative case joined with a predicate that does not include a finite verb and functioning usually as a sentence modifier, the most common being an adjective or a participle (present participle or past participle in English).

It is usually at the beginning or end of the sentence, although it can also appear in the middle. Its parallel is the ablative absolute in Latin, the genitive absolute in Greek, or the locative absolute in Sanskrit.

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  • I wouldn’t consider “a cure for Alzheimer's Disease” a nominative absolute; for one thing, it seems to function as a direct object. The phrase “a possibility” appears to be an object complement, as in the sentence “I think it a possibility.” Commented Jun 3, 2022 at 11:18
  • @MarcInManhattan I believe that you are correct. I had some doubt about my answer despite the positional information in Wikipedia but I failed to recall “object complement”. I will do the decent thing and delete my answer. If you care to make your comment an answer, I commend it to the questioner.
    – Anton
    Commented Jun 3, 2022 at 13:21
  • I find I cannot delete an accepted answer, so suggest the questioner unaccept it so that @MarcInManhattan answer (if made from his comment) may be accepted. Otherwise I shall have to modify my answer.
    – Anton
    Commented Jun 3, 2022 at 13:24
  • Actually, the rule is to be-deletion. Tensed verbs can't be deleted from tensed clauses. However, think, like consider, can also take an infinitive and governs to be-deletion. The original clause is thus who think a cure for Alzheimer's Disease to be a possibility, Commented Jun 3, 2022 at 14:06
  • @Anton Since your answer is accepted, I think the best approach is probably just to modify it. Commented Jun 3, 2022 at 18:40

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