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  1. Does the usage of the names of specific national dishes here represent the countries? Can we affirm that the author uses a synecdoche?

Even if you’re not bold enough to try bubble and squeak, haggis and tatties, or cockles and laverbread, you’ll still enjoy this perfect sampling of England, Scotland, and Wales. Our most popular tour of Britain, this tri-country introductory vacation has something for everyone.

  1. Is this a periphrasis? This phrase describes important, defining traits of the tour (an object of description).

...perfect sampling of England, Scotland, and Wales.

Text is from: https://www.globusjourneys.co.uk

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  • It's almost certainly a pun based on 'sampling' (synonymous apart from POS with the earlier 'try[ing]') used in a different sense, 'experiencing different aspects of landscape, culture, gastronomic delights ... associated with England, ...'. Since 'associated with' is implied, this is metonymy. Commented May 26, 2022 at 19:11

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bubble and squeak, haggis and tatties, or cockles and laverbread

These are national/regional dishes and literal.

Even if you’re not bold enough to try bubble and squeak, haggis and tatties, or cockles and laverbread,

This is a long adverbial clause and can be omitted.

you’ll still enjoy this perfect sampling of England, Scotland, and Wales.

This is the main clause and England, Scotland, and Wales are literal.

sampling

This is not the usual verb to describe visiting each country as a sample of what they are each like, but it is a valid one. (Obviously there is a weak pun - so weak that it may not exist - to trying/sampling the meals but, as I mention, these are literal.)

The result is that there is no synecdoche or periphrasis.

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  • But each dish represents an extreme cuisine firmly linked to each country. "Would haggis and tatties step up to the podium." The Scot rises. If not structured as synecdoche, it functions as such.
    – Zan700
    Commented May 26, 2022 at 20:12
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    Each dish does not represent, it is. It is literal. Your example is synecdoche/metonymy as clearly, a plate of haggis and tatties is not going to go to the stage, whereas the happy voyagers will eat (or not) the meals.
    – Greybeard
    Commented May 26, 2022 at 20:19
  • Each dish is, but each also represents. I didn't say is synecdoche, but functions as synecdoche, embellishing the whole through the part in an engaging, negative way. The happy voyagers will not eat the meals.
    – Zan700
    Commented May 26, 2022 at 21:35

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