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Just got a question when I was reading a Guardian editorial:

The closure of Cinderella – it may fare better on Broadway, where it is headed – is also a reminder of the long tail of Covid, which may have created the most difficult and uncertain period for the performing arts since the 1665 plague shut London’s playhouses. Some hoped that the economic disruption would precipitate more fairness and equality in the way cultural workers are employed. Like many hopes of change to come out of the pandemic, that seems overly optimistic. But the least producers could do is treat their employees with courtesy.

I am quite confused about the sentence in bold since it looks like there are two possible explanations to me:

  1. Like many hopes of change // to come out of the pandemic...

  2. Like many hopes of change to come // out of the pandemic...

In the first version, the "to come out of the pandemic" modifies the word "change" while the second version indicates that "change to come" should be a set phrase (just like "there are more changes to come") and "out the pandemic" modifies "hopes of change to come".

Personally, I prefer the second one but I would still like to have a closer look at the sentence.

Thanks in advance!

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    It's the first one. The second phrasing leaves "out of the pandemic" in the cold. But I don't agree that "to come out of the pandemic" modifies the word "change", but "hopes of change" is a noun phrase. May 6 at 8:20
  • "Like many [of the] hopes that change would result from the pandemic..." May 6 at 10:01

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