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I have difficulty understanding the middle part of the sentence:

He carries just a tent, a sleeping bag and a few basic supplies, all of which he pushes a baby stroller, as he found that it requires less effort than carrying a backpack.

I know it's a relative clause, but is it grammatically correct?

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    I would bet good money that there is a missing word "in" before "a baby stroller" Mar 11, 2022 at 3:49
  • @DJClayworth So true. It makes no sense without a preposition.
    – BoldBen
    Mar 11, 2022 at 8:06

2 Answers 2

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As the comment says, the quote is probably missing the word in, inserted in bold here:

He carries just a tent, a sleeping bag and a few basic supplies, all of which he pushes in a baby stroller, as he found that it requires less effort than carrying a backpack.

To clarify the sentence structure, the word which in all of which is a pronoun. Its antecedent is the list the sentence starts with (tent, sleeping bag, etc.)
So, it means that he pushes all of those things in a baby stroller.

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He carries just a tent, a sleeping bag and a few basic supplies, all of which put in a baby stroller he pushes, as he finds that it requires less effort than carrying a backpack.

He carries just a tent, a sleeping bag and a few basic supplies in a baby stroller he pushes, as he finds that it requires less effort than carrying a backpack.

He pushes a baby stroller carrying just a tent, a sleeping bag and a few basic supplies, as he finds that it requires less effort than carrying a backpack.

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