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This is a sentence in my paper:

To end with, the authors suggest further research on self-focused benefits could be helpful for recruiting “human books”, which is one of the most challenging aspects of hosting a “human library”.

I would like to refer "which is" to the action "recruiting human books". But I am afraid in this sentence structure, the "which is" will refer to the whole sentences "the authors suggest further research.....". Could I ask is this sentence right and how to correct it? Or word other than "which is" should be used?

Sorry for any possible error, non-native speaker:(

2 Answers 2

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The 'which' refers to the recruitment of "human books". That is the process of recruiting these people. The use of the pronoun avoids repetition and allows the use of a single, more complex sentence than one of the alternatives which is:

To end with, the authors suggest further research on self-focused benefits could be helpful for recruiting “human books”. The recruitment of "human books" is one of the most challenging aspects of hosting a “human library”.

It is rare for the phrase "which is" to refer to anything other than the most recent concept in the sentence. Notice that in this answer I have used it to refer to "one of the alternatives". If in doubt about this sort of usage try applying Occam's Razor

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  • Oh I see. It is "which is" who make the confusion, thank you for answering
    – ss2334
    Mar 10, 2022 at 14:22
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I think you can just delete "which is".

The new sentence is

To end with, the authors suggest further research on self-focused benefits could be helpful for recruiting “human books”, one of the most challenging aspects of hosting a “human library”.

In this way ambiguity is eliminated.

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