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So I was hoping if someone could support that chremamorphism is the literary technique term for objectification. Specifically, I am looking at the phrase "the pushing of your sadness". Sadness, a personal attribute, is being depicted as an object which I think aligns with chremamorphism. Am I misunderstanding the technique, or is there a better term for the concept of objectification in literature?

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    The only words starting with chrema- that I could find with a quick search had to to with finance or money. Do you have a reference for chremamorphism? Feb 26 at 3:12
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    I had only looked in dictionaries at onelook.com. A general search finds a lot of support for chremamorphism in the sense you mention. Maybe someone with a better dictionary (OED, for example?) could look it up. Feb 26 at 6:45
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    OED: No dictionary entries found for ‘chremamorphism’. Find ‘chremamorphism’ in: » phrases (0) definitions (0) etymologies (0) quotations (0) full text (0), From Google Books: Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion: Early Greek religion By A & I Petrovic: The labels Empedocles uses are revealing, ... chrema is an oracle, and psephisma is a decree. -- The Therapeutic Interview in Mental Health 2017 DörrZegers (1995) talks about this in terms of a “chrematic transformation” (chrema = corpse) Chrema is the inanimate nature to which the melancholic's body is reduced. Don't use it.
    – Greybeard
    Feb 26 at 9:41
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    @Greybeard That's an answer. Please use the answer box for answers.
    – Andrew Leach
    Feb 26 at 12:03

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There is no OED entry for ‘chremamorphism’. Even the request to find ‘chremamorphism’ in the OED's phrases (0) definitions (0) etymologies (0) quotations (0) full text (0), gives a nil result.

From Google Books we have:

"Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion: Early Greek religion" By A & I Petrovic, we have

The labels Empedocles uses are revealing, ... chrema is an oracle, and psephisma is a decree.

Whereas in "The Therapeutic Interview in Mental Health 2017" we have

Dörr Zegers (1995) talks about this in terms of a “chrematic transformation” (chrema = corpse) Chrema is the inanimate nature to which the melancholic's body is reduced."

The conclusion must be: Don't use chremamorphism.

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  • It might not be the up-to-date answer omniscience could give, but 'the conclusion must be: Don't use "chremamorphism" ' after lack of reasonable evidence turned up in sensible research seems the acceptable answer short of this. Feb 27 at 16:35

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