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I am trying to write a sentence that says how others had the capability to pay for extra classes other than school to get better learning.

My peers always had their parents who could pay for tuition classes, while I had to study on my own.

I am attempting to give an idea that I could afford extra classes.

Question is are both correct or one of them means different then the other?

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  • Do you mean some sort of supplemental paid private tutoring that's separate from free public schooling open to all? Or do you mean actually attending a private school where you pay tuition rather than a public one where you do not?
    – tchrist
    Dec 11, 2021 at 16:09
  • I am in the US. I would not say "tuition classes" like this. Perhaps I would say "parents who could pay for extra classes".
    – GEdgar
    Dec 11, 2021 at 16:13
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    In the US, you pay a tutor to teach you in private. Those private lessons are not called tuition in the US. Tuition in the US is the money you pay to attend a school or university. The Brits do call this private tuition and also use the word tutor. So the person giving the lessons has the same name in both places but the teaching is not called the same thing.
    – Lambie
    Dec 11, 2021 at 16:48
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    Tuition classes doesn't mean anything in the U.S. The phrase is not current. Dec 11, 2021 at 18:01

4 Answers 4

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In a comment, John Lawler wrote:

Tuition classes doesn't mean anything in the U.S. The phrase is not current.

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In a comment GEdgar wrote:

I am in the US. I would not say "tuition classes" like this. Perhaps I would say "parents who could pay for extra classes".

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In a comment, Lambie wrote:

In the US, you pay a tutor to teach you in private. Those private lessons are not called tuition in the US. Tuition in the US is the money you pay to attend a school or university. The Brits do call this private tuition and also use the word tutor. So the person giving the lessons has the same name in both places but the teaching is not called the same thing.

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  • I agree except that I thought "tutor" in UK English was different from "tutor" in the US (but I'm not an expert on UK English). Dec 12, 2021 at 5:40
  • It should be noted that in British English, the words tuition and tutor do not by themselves mean that the teaching is arranged for outside an educational institution and is intended to supplement the education provided there; if this is meant (as in the OP's case) it needs to be made explicit, unless the context makes it obvious.
    – jsw29
    Dec 12, 2021 at 16:21
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In a comment, Jim wrote:

Based on the comments maybe what you want is: “... parents who could pay for tutors, while I had to study on my own.”

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