0

...and it is this possibility, which is clearly provided for in language, that has encouraged a rival idea (8), namely that needing is always by its nature needing for a purpose - any purpose at all that may be specified - and that statements of need which do not mention relevant purposes are somehow elliptical (according to some, dishonestly elliptical) for sentences that do not mention them(9). One thing seems right with the elliptical view and another seems wrong. Let's take the right thing first.

Any search of elliptical means 'having been omitted', I fail to see how this applies here.

1
  • Please give at least one dictionary definition. The first definitions I came across for the linguistic sense were 'using or involving ellipsis' ... 'language that is extremely/excessively terse, omissions possibly making it hard to understand' (I'm paraphrasing). Dec 4 '21 at 12:34
0

statements of need which do not mention relevant purposes are somehow elliptical (according to some, dishonestly elliptical) for sentences that do not mention them

In this case the sentences have an element that is omitted, e.g.

"I need a hammer"

In itself, this is a good sentence but is it a shortened form of

"I need a hammer [in order] to hammer this nail into this wood."?

Thus stating the purpose of the need.

1
  • Ah, this helps a lot, especially since the essay itself concerned need. Thanks a lot Dec 4 '21 at 14:46

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.