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What's the word that can be used to describe someone who has mastery over English?

They have command over the way that they use English, and they are perceptive in how they read English.

Doesn't have to be English in particular.

Such a person would be a good debater, good orator, capable of making astute critical analyses of works of literature, reading dense texts, etc.

I don't mind whether answers are nouns or adjectives.

You are a ______ (noun like "virtuoso")

You have a ______ (noun like "mastery")

You are _____ (adjective like "erudite")

Not the same question as What do we call a person who is really smooth at talking? because I am interested in what to call someone who is good at comprehending English and its nuances, is effective at using and interpreting the language. Not just someone who is a smooth-talker. The other question doesn't sound profound enough, especially not the answers. My guy's got gravitas about him, an academic kind of elevated status.

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3 Answers 3

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It doesn't fit quite perfectly, but the word deipnosophist comes to mind. A deipnosophist is a person who has great table conversation skills.

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There is the adjective

articulate

1 Having or showing the ability to speak fluently and coherently.

Celeste is an articulate, eloquent speaker with an electrifying style.

From Lexico.

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The Cambridge Online Dictionary defines fluent as

When a person is fluent, they can speak a language easily, well, and quickly. (With the example "She's fluent in French")

and

When a language is fluent, it is spoken easily and without many pauses (with the example "He speaks fluent Chinese")

It is used for languages other than the person's native tongue. If someone grows up speaking more than one language (Welsh and English, Urdu and English or Spanish and Russian for instance) they are regarded as bilingual. If they have grown up speaking more than two they are regarded as multilingual. We would not say that a bilingual person is 'fluent' in either language but someone who is bilingual in French and Arabic for example could become fluent in English through study or exposure to English later in life.

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