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Im reading the following two sentances. I feel that the second AND in both of the sentances should be removed, but im not sure gramaticly how to do it correctly.

a) am i correct in my thought that the second AND is not correct.

b) if so would you change the sentances to remove the second AND

Part of the brief was to create easy open plan spaces that weren’t clinical and cold, AND worked with a modern lifestyle.

Key to the success of the project was to create a house that felt easy and relaxed AND where none of the aesthetics felt forced.

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  • [Am I correct in thinking....]. This is basically editing.
    – Lambie
    Nov 24 at 15:53
  • which worked with////and just remove the second and in the second
    – Lambie
    Nov 24 at 15:55
  • "weren't clinical or cold", unless you're happy with a place that is clinical but warm. ("And" follows fine then.)
    – Stuart F
    Nov 24 at 17:41
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(1) You can avoid the arguable garden-path effect here ( ... that weren't A and B and C) simply by adding a second 'that' (though the comma is arguably sufficient):

  • Part of the brief was to create easy open plan spaces that weren’t clinical and cold, and that worked with a modern lifestyle.

(2) Here, the addition of a comma is certainly sufficient to show that the second 'and' is 'higher-level':

  • Key to the success of the project was to create a house that felt easy and relaxed, and where none of the aesthetics felt forced.

The effect is to 'promote' the second 'and' to an obvious relative-clause-coordinator. Some might like

  • Key to the success of the project was to create a house that felt easy & relaxed, and where none of the aesthetics felt forced.

But this is messy and better reserved for complex lists.

[References covering the disambiguation of different coordination levels of 'and' in various sentences, other than in lists, potentially extremely difficult to find.]

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  • Thanks @Edwin Ashworth , whats your thoughts on using a comma in front of an "and". Personally i feel its a useful piece of grammar, but i was always taught (school in the UK) that a comma before an and is not grammatically correct.
    – sam
    Nov 24 at 21:10
  • See ect's answer, sam (particularly the 'Grammartips' recommendation) and the comment where I've reinstated (and augmented) T.E.D.'s answer at Comma before 'and' in compound sentences. Nov 25 at 11:41

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