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What verb would you use to describe solving the problem of there being a lack of something? For example, if there is a lack of money, and someone makes a donation, they would have ... the lack of money?

According to Google Ngram viewer, remedy would be best choice out of fill,remedy,resolve and compensate, but I wonder if there's a better alternative.

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  • Thank you. Maybe I was unclear, but I'm looking for a verb to use before the phrase "a lack of something", that indicates the lack is no longer there.
    – Lara
    Nov 23, 2021 at 16:40
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    For example, in scientific articles you could see "The proposed methodology may be extensible to similar tools and tries to fill the lack of scientific studies in the validation and acceptance of computer-based educational tools." or "To remedy this lack a comprehensive survey has been carried out of the geochemistry of the large...". Are fill or remedy the best options here?
    – Lara
    Nov 23, 2021 at 16:44
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    avert / obviate, perhaps?
    – user405662
    Nov 23, 2021 at 17:00
  • I was thinking 'resolve', but 'remedy' is probably better. I'm not sure if you will get a formal answer, as this appears to be either a General Reference issue, or possibly Primarily-Opinion-Based.... Nov 23, 2021 at 17:06
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    Thank you, @Cascabel -- very kind of you. I had a rocky start, but I think I've found my sea legs :-)
    – DjinTonic
    Nov 23, 2021 at 17:54

1 Answer 1

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I propose a different verb from 'fill' in the commented example. Lexico has

address
VERB

3 Think about and begin to deal with (an issue or problem)

a fundamental problem has still to be addressed

Which rephrases the sentence as

The proposed methodology may be extensible to similar tools and tries to address the lack of scientific studies in the validation and acceptance of computer-based educational tools.

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