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"But perhaps most importantly, UF simply should not be looking to Governor DeSantis to decide which speech activities it will permit its employees and students to engage in,” the ACLU’s Daniel Tilley wrote to university officials.

Is the subject, as regards the verb "decide", here "UF" or "Governor DeSantis"?

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    – tchrist
    Nov 12 '21 at 14:14
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The quoted sentence is

But perhaps most importantly, UF simply should not be looking to Governor DeSantis to decide which speech activities it will permit its employees and students to engage in.

The subject of the overall sentence is UF.
"Governor DeSantis to decide..." is an infinitive clause whose subject is "Governor DeSantis".

The phrase "should not be looking to GDS to decide" is equivalent to "should not be expecting GDS to decide".

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The original sentence, with bells and whistles removed, asking about the subject of decide:

UF should not look to Governor DeSantis to decide which ...

The answer is ambiguous. The original writer may have intended to refer to the governor doing the deciding, as he is clearly trying to do, or they may have intended to refer to the UF (University of Florida) being the decider, as it normally would. The look to construction doesn't forbid either one.

One of the problems with long complicated sentences of the kind one finds in official brouhahas like this is that they tend not to be clear. This is a good example.

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