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What is the part but which supposed to mean?

"At that time, his philosophy, which was concerned with productivity, but which was often misinterpreted as promoting worker interests at the expense of management, was in marked contrast to the prevailing industrial norms of worker exploitation."

I am confused about the but which part. If "which was often misinterpreted as promoting worker interests at the expense of management" part is a relative clause, then what kind of word is "but". Similarly, if "but" is to be a conjunction, then "which" should be "it", isn't it?

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The sentence is correct. The whole of "which was concerned with productivity, but which was often misinterpreted as promoting worker interests at the expense of management" is the relative clause concerning "his philosophy".

It's the length that may be causing confusion. A simpler example would be:

"The door, which was thought to be locked, but which later turned out to be open, was at the other end of the room."

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  • Oh, so "but which" basically adds more information to the subject while being the relative clause, right? If you don't mind, can you tell me what part of speech "but" is and if such clause can be used with other words like "and" as in: "The book, which I had bought from a bookstore, and which cost me a fortune, turned out to be fake". I would appreciate your answer. Sep 13, 2021 at 8:18
  • It's a conjunction. It connects the two parts of the relative clause. "and" would also work.
    – dubious
    Sep 13, 2021 at 8:39
  • It connects two relative clauses, just like and could. In fact, but means and, but has a presupposition of surprise. Sep 13, 2021 at 14:18

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