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In the below sentence, is 'now' a preposition or a subordinating conjunction? Most dictionaries (OED, Webster, AHD, etc.) say that 'now' is a (subordinating) conjunction in the sense of the below sentence, but I am aware that some prepositions can take clausal complements; thus I am unsure whether 'now' in the sense below is a preposition licensing a content clause as a complement,or a conjunction (since dictionaries are not known to be the best sources for checking parts of speech).

Now that we are all here, let us begin.

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    Your right that some prepositions take causal complements, but dictionaries take decades to write and often centuries to fully update. For this reason most dictionaries use 19th century grammar terminology and are not a good source of grammar information. Once you remove all the prepositions from the 19th century subordinating conjunction category, there are only 5 or so true subordinator left: that, whether, if, for and some uses of how. The word now in your example is indeed a preposition taking a clausal complement. Sep 11, 2021 at 12:43
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    It's a preposition used deictically with a content clause complement specifying what distinguishes present time from the pre-now period.
    – BillJ
    Sep 11, 2021 at 12:46

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Now that we are all here, let us begin.

I agree with Araucaria's comment.

It's a preposition used deictically with a content clause complement specifying what distinguishes present time from the pre-now period.

It can't be a conjunction, since "that" is an indisputable conjunction and two adjacent conjunctions are not permitted.

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  • Re: "two adjacent conjunctions are not permitted": Consider "It is clear that [...], and that [...]".
    – ruakh
    Sep 11, 2021 at 23:55
  • @ruakh There's nothing to consider. They are not adjacent, but introduce two separate clauses each introduced by a conjunction.
    – BillJ
    Sep 12, 2021 at 6:09
  • If by "adjacent" you mean something other than "immediately preceding or following" (sense 1c at merriam-webster.com/dictionary/adjacent), could you provide some information about what you do mean by it?
    – ruakh
    Sep 12, 2021 at 18:26
  • @ruakh In your example the two ‘that’s at separated by the word ‘and’. Hence neither immediately preceded or follows the other. Sep 13, 2021 at 6:54
  • Wake up @ruakh It's obvious what I meant. I explained in my previous comment that the two conjunctions in your example introduce separate clauses and hence are not adjacent in the same clause.
    – BillJ
    Sep 13, 2021 at 7:35

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